Umbrian


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Um·bri·an

 (ŭm′brē-ən)
adj.
Of or relating to Umbria.
n.
1. The Italic language of ancient Umbria.
2. A native or inhabitant of Umbria.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Umbrian

(ˈʌmbrɪən)
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to Umbria, its inhabitants, their dialect of Italian, or the ancient language once spoken there
2. (Languages) of or relating to Umbria, its inhabitants, their dialect of Italian, or the ancient language once spoken there
3. (Placename) of or relating to Umbria, its inhabitants, their dialect of Italian, or the ancient language once spoken there
4. (Historical Terms) of or relating to Umbria, its inhabitants, their dialect of Italian, or the ancient language once spoken there
5. (Art Movements) of or relating to a Renaissance school of painting that included Raphael
n
6. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Umbria
7. (Languages) an extinct language of ancient S Italy, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family. See also Osco-Umbrian
8. (Historical Terms) an extinct language of ancient S Italy, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family. See also Osco-Umbrian
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Um•bri•an

(ˈʌm bri ən)
n.
1. a native or inhabitant of ancient or modern Umbria.
2. an Italic language of ancient Umbria.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Umbria, its inhabitants, or their language.
[1595]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Umbrian - an extinct Italic language of ancient southern ItalyUmbrian - an extinct Italic language of ancient southern Italy
Osco-Umbrian - a group of dead languages of ancient Italy; they were displace by Latin
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Princess Nourah bint Saad chose to invest in Umbrian football club Spoleto after considering several aspects.
Nonetheless, African, Roman or Umbrian, none of the Valentines seems to have been a romantic.'
In the Umbrian town of Assisi, a man sits contemplating two missing works by an early Renaissance master, Fra Angelico, weighing the existence of good and evil, secular and divine, transitory and eternal.
While the Umbrian town of Norcia in Italy is still (http://www.ibtimes.com/how-help-italy-earthquake-victims-8-ways-donate-blood-money-goods-relief-2406448) dealing with the damage done by a 6.2 magnitude earthquake that struck Wednesday, it may just be the beginning of more disasters to come.
First images of damage showed debris in the street and some collapsed buildings in towns and villages that dot much of the Umbrian countryside.
THE brilliant Baghdaddies will be going bagpipe crazy in a groundbreaking performance as part of the 49th Morpeth North umbrian Gathering.
I discovered Sagrantino, the robust red wine made from the Umbrian grape that is a pride of the region.
"The quality of Umbrian wines has grown considerably over the past 20 years, thanks to entrepreneurs like Caprai, Antonelli, Tabarrini, Bea, Antano, Palazzone, Antinori, etc.," says Giuseppe Rosati, wine director at New York's Felidia Italian restaurant.
Among the topics are the discovery of Carian Melia and the archaic Panionian, the landscape and identity of Greek colonists and indigenous communities in southeast Italy, the evidence from sanctuaries between the sixth and fourth centuries BC concerning the ethnicity and identity of the Latins, expressing Umbrian identity in the landscape, and ethnicity and the economy of power in Iron Age north-west Iberia.
It's 15 miles from the Umbrian capital of Perugia (a two-and-a-halfhour flight from England), and a 15-minute drive from the market town of Umbertide, half of it along a topsy-turvy roller-coaster of a road so basic it could be a rally route - in fact it was in my rented Lancia.