unbranded

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un·brand·ed

 (ŭn-brăn′dĭd)
adj.
Not branded or carrying a brand name: unbranded cattle; unbranded merchandise.

unbranded

(ʌnˈbrændɪd)
adj
1. (Clothing & Fashion) not having a brand name
2. (Marketing) not having a brand name
3. (Agriculture) (of an animal) not having been branded (with a branding iron)

un•brand•ed

(ʌnˈbræn dɪd)

adj.
1. not branded or marked to show ownership.
2. carrying no commercial brand or trademark.
[1635–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unbranded - not marked with a brandunbranded - not marked with a brand; "unbranded cattle"
branded - marked with a brand; "branded cattle"; "branded criminal"
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually removing or covering up those recognizable elements is a matter of simple cosmetic construction work, but plan for any necessary "unbranding" as part of the overall construction scope and budget.
Unbranding the Modern Medicine, estudio la organizacion de las firmas de genericos estadounidenses, y analiza los debates a la luz de las investigaciones desarrolladas por el Subcommittee on Antitrust and Monopoly del Senado estadounidense.
Generic: The Unbranding of Modern Medicine (reprint, 2014)
GENERIC: THE UNBRANDING OF MODERN MEDICINE comes from a physician and historian who offers a history of not just the development of generic drugs, but how they differ from the original.
(216) But current law does not impose such a restriction on trademark owners, nor does it restrict other stealth marketing practices--such as "unbranding"--that arguably interfere with consumer expectations and autonomy in a similar way.
Andrew Blakeley: I actually think the unbranding of cigarettes will make them cooler and more desirable, if anything.
Unbranding is the practice of eliminating or selectively reducing
She has profound activist assumptions and intentions that surfaced even in the initial stages of writing, as she aggressively insured the preservation of her chapter called "Unbranding," which--unlike most literature that focuses on the vulnerability and victimization of youth--highlights kids' fighting their exploitation in a variety of small and large ways.
The entries examine brands, key figures, and important places at the forefront of unbranding, as well as new techniques for branding, engaging the consumer, and generating interest in ecologically sustainable products and places.
Furthermore, it has the "unbranding" possibility which could be very interesting for media and production companies that plan to resell the solution.