oceanography

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Related to Undersea Exploration: Seafloor exploration

o·cean·og·ra·phy

 (ō′shə-nŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The exploration and scientific study of the ocean and its phenomena. Also called oceanology.

o′cean·og′ra·pher n.
o′cean·o·graph′ic (ō′shə-nə-grăf′ĭk), o′cean·o·graph′i·cal adj.
o′cean·o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oceanography

(ˌəʊʃəˈnɒɡrəfɪ; ˌəʊʃɪə-)
n
(Physical Geography) the branch of science dealing with the physical, chemical, geological, and biological features of the oceans and ocean basins
ˌoceanˈographer n
oceanographic, ˌoceanoˈgraphical adj
ˌoceanoˈgraphically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•cea•nog•ra•phy

(ˌoʊ ʃəˈnɒg rə fi, ˌoʊ ʃi ə-)

n.
the branch of physical geography dealing with the ocean.
[1855–60; < German Oceanographie, Ozeanographie; see ocean, -o-, -graphy]
o`cea•nog′ra•pher, n.
o`cea•no•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) o`cea•no•graph′i•cal, adj.
o`cea•no•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·cean·og·ra·phy

(ō′shə-nŏg′rə-fē)
The scientific study of oceans, the life that inhabits them, and their physical characteristics, including the depth and extent of ocean waters, their movement and chemical makeup, and the topography and composition of the ocean floors. Oceanography also includes ocean exploration.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oceanography

The study of the sea, embracing and integrating all knowledge pertaining to the sea and its physical boundaries, the chemistry and physics of seawater, and marine biology.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

oceanography

the branch of physical geography that studies oceans and seas. — oceanographer, n. — oceanographic, oceanographical, adj.
See also: Sea
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

oceanography

1. The study of oceans, including seawater, the ocean floor, and marine plants and animals.
2. The study of oceans and their life.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oceanography - the branch of science dealing with physical and biological aspects of the oceansoceanography - the branch of science dealing with physical and biological aspects of the oceans
earth science - any of the sciences that deal with the earth or its parts
hydrography - the science of the measurement and description and mapping of the surface waters of the earth with special reference to navigation
El Nino - (oceanography) a warm ocean current that flows along the equator from the date line and south off the coast of Ecuador at Christmas time
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
oceanografija
oceanográfia

oceanography

[ˌəʊʃəˈnɒgrəfɪ] Noceanografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

oceanography

[ˌəʊʃəˈnɒgrəfi] nocéanographie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

oceanography

nOzeanografie f, → Meereskunde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

oceanography

[ˌəʊʃəˈnɒgrəfɪ] noceanografia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
They perform tasks deemed too dangerous, unfit, or inconvenient for humans ranging from undersea exploration and defense to aerial surveying; crop dusting; and, perhaps soon, daily package delivery.
Since then, games, conventions, movies, competitions and amusement parks have been developed under the brand, with themes ranging from science, dinosaurs, undersea exploration to the Wild West.
You begin the game inside a single-berth undersea exploration suit (affectionately described as a 'walking coffin') returning to your deep sea oil rig, and this unwieldy armour escalates the claustrophobic atmosphere of the gloomy depths.
Harry Roque said the current process being followed by the UN-linked agency International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) in naming undersea features was controlled only by rich countries capable of conducting undersea exploration.
For Cottman, the story of the Henrietta Marie is the perfect intersection of his African heritage, his journalistic curiosity, and his joy in undersea exploration. He tracks down information about the ship's British captains, the foundry that forged the canons, shackles, and bell found on the Florida sea floor, as well as the plantation owner who commissioned the sale of hundreds of kidnapped Africans, and conjectures on the unknown and unknowable stories of the slaves themselves.
Lindbergh Award for technology and environment, the Rockefeller Public Service Award for Protection of Natural Resources, the Smithsonian Institution's Matthew Fontaine Maury Award for Contributions to Undersea Exploration, the International Conservation Award of the National Wildlife Federation, and the International Meteorological Organization Prize.
Sharing the Coast Conference - Eighth annual event will be held Friday through Sunday at Southwestern Oregon Community College in Coos Bay; a collaboration of Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition and Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators, the conference will feature speakers on topics ranging from oceanography and undersea exploration to beach ecology and climate change; registration at tinyurl.com/sharingthecoast2016 or in person; more information at oregonshores.org/coastwatch.php5, 541-270-0027 or fawn@oregonshores.org.
We may think first of archaeologists as diggers in ruins; but we are also informed about undersea exploration and the raising of the Titanic and about the mountaineering discovery of the Inca child mummies (surely enough to send a shiver down the spine of any child).
A panel including TV adventurer Bear Grylls drew up a "wonder list" ahead of the public vote, which placed undersea exploration at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia in second spot.
Although the exploitation of Arctic waters would be subject to the 200-mile exclusive economic zone, undersea exploration for gas, oil and minerals is likely to emerge as a hotly contested issue.
The vents' striking "black smoker" chimneys, like this one near New Zealand, quickly became icons of undersea exploration. But some scientists now say hydrothermal vents could have been discovered in Antarctic waters a decade earlier if scientists had realized what they were seeing.