understorey


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understorey

or

understory

n, pl -reys or -ries
(Forestry) a lower tier of shrubs and small trees under the main canopy of forest trees
Translations

understorey

[ˈʌndəˌstɔːrɪ] Nmonte m bajo
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the growing prevalence of Amazonian wildfires, we still have a very limited understanding of why these low intensity understorey fires cause such high rates of tree mortality, which species functional traits predict vulnerability or survival to these fires, what are the impacts of wildfires on the forest carbon balance and what are the patterns of taxonomic and functional recovery following a fire event.
After 10 years, monitoring was discontinued because many of the sites had become impenetrable thickets of understorey species such as Coast Tea-tree and Coast Wattle Acacia longifolia subsp.
He can be found on the understorey level, located on the second floor within the indoor tropical forest.
The proposal also includes the erection of a triple garage to replace a dilapidated raised parking platform, with a garden store at understorey level and ancillary accommodation in the roof space above.
Due to the growth of the understorey bamboo requiring sufficient light, bamboo leaves from forests with a low canopy were the most nutritious.
Researchers say uncontrolled wildfires in the understorey - or ground level - of humid tropical forests during extreme droughts are a large and poorly quantified source of CO2 emissions.
An understorey species, Pomaderris aspera, made a major contribution to the Ca return in the litter and, as well as having a high Ca concentration in its foliage, CaOx druses were found in the leaves, although they were not identified as such.
An epic saga of a fantasy action/adventure novel, "Echoes of Understorey" is the second title in author Thoraiya Dyer's outstanding 'Titan's Forest' series.
Edge effects on the understorey bird community in a logged forest in Uganda.
While leaves of tree seedlings and saplings grow in a similar environment of the understorey, large trees need to produce leaves with a distinct development of traits that are acclimated to different environmental conditions in the canopy.
Although FVAs reflect climate and soil conditions, the approach does not account for other factors known to affect understorey vegetation such as stand development stage (Jules et al.