unhang

(redirected from Unhung)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

unhang

(ʌnˈhæŋ)
vb (tr)
to release from a hanging, or unstable, position
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

unhang


Past participle: unhung
Gerund: unhanging

Imperative
unhang
unhang
Present
I unhang
you unhang
he/she/it unhangs
we unhang
you unhang
they unhang
Preterite
I unhung
you unhung
he/she/it unhung
we unhung
you unhung
they unhung
Present Continuous
I am unhanging
you are unhanging
he/she/it is unhanging
we are unhanging
you are unhanging
they are unhanging
Present Perfect
I have unhung
you have unhung
he/she/it has unhung
we have unhung
you have unhung
they have unhung
Past Continuous
I was unhanging
you were unhanging
he/she/it was unhanging
we were unhanging
you were unhanging
they were unhanging
Past Perfect
I had unhung
you had unhung
he/she/it had unhung
we had unhung
you had unhung
they had unhung
Future
I will unhang
you will unhang
he/she/it will unhang
we will unhang
you will unhang
they will unhang
Future Perfect
I will have unhung
you will have unhung
he/she/it will have unhung
we will have unhung
you will have unhung
they will have unhung
Future Continuous
I will be unhanging
you will be unhanging
he/she/it will be unhanging
we will be unhanging
you will be unhanging
they will be unhanging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been unhanging
you have been unhanging
he/she/it has been unhanging
we have been unhanging
you have been unhanging
they have been unhanging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been unhanging
you will have been unhanging
he/she/it will have been unhanging
we will have been unhanging
you will have been unhanging
they will have been unhanging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been unhanging
you had been unhanging
he/she/it had been unhanging
we had been unhanging
you had been unhanging
they had been unhanging
Conditional
I would unhang
you would unhang
he/she/it would unhang
we would unhang
you would unhang
they would unhang
Past Conditional
I would have unhung
you would have unhung
he/she/it would have unhung
we would have unhung
you would have unhung
they would have unhung
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
Translations

unhang

vt painting etcab- or herunternehmen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
He's been in every prison on the Continent and has assassinated more persons than any gentleman unhung. He always goes about with a bomb in his pocket, and of course it makes conversation a little difficult because if you don't agree with him he lays it on the table in a marked manner."
He "had" me indeed, and in a cleft stick; for who would ever absolve me, who would consent that I should go unhung, if, by the faintest tremor of an overture, I were the first to introduce into our perfect intercourse an element so dire?
"There, old fellow," said he; "swallow that, and if you don't get some sleep the chemist who made it up is the greatest liar unhung."
There is no greater devil unhung in a general way, battening as he does upon human agony and flesh in the shape of slaves.
"If I am to meet with this wild ruffian it were better that five knights were sacrificed than fifty, for either number would be but a mouthful to that horrid horde of unhung murderers.
You have the honour of being sister to one of the greatest scoundrels unhung; and, if I may venture to say so to a lady, you are in every respect quite worthy of him.
I've killed a robber, a usurer, a jackal, a blackmailer, the cleverest and the cruellest villain unhung. I'm ready to hang for him.
And all the time I am the greatest cur unhung!" (Tommy and Grizel 243).
But after its arrival, the bell remained in the belfry of the Catholic Chapel for years, unhung, unrung, sitting in silence.
Men get appointed sometimes as policemen, who are no better than the unhung villains who prowl about our streets at night for theft and robbery."
Left by their mothers in Cafe de Sade, before the unhung portrait of a dead philosopher, they too never still and quiet, their faces gay with discovery, their work immense.
I say terrifying because, in our house, the mistletoe is still unhung, the cards unwritten, the goose uncooked and where the hell are the lights for the tree.?