causality

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Related to Unicausality: causal agent, Cause and effect theory

cau·sal·i·ty

 (kô-zăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. cau·sal·i·ties
1. The principle of or relationship between cause and effect.
2. A causal agency, force, or quality.

causality

(kɔːˈzælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the relationship of cause and effect
b. the principle that nothing can happen without being caused
2. causal agency or quality

cau•sal•i•ty

(kɔˈzæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the relation of cause and effect.
2. causal quality or agency.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causality - the relation between causes and effects
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
Translations

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪtɪ] Ncausalidad f

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪti] ncausalité f

causality

nKausalität f

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪtɪ] ncausalità
References in periodicals archive ?
Those tempted to commit the fallacy of unicausality may recall that Hicks once denounced the "sham dispute" between those who argued that interest rates matched flows of saving with investment, and those who claimed that interest rates were governed by stocks, such as capital and money.
Nonetheless, the initial view of unicausality (later modified by the distinction of primary and secondary causes), uncinariasis' malnutrition effects (accepted medical knowledge), and the sanitary issues of persistent relapse by reinfection and soil pollution (recognized very early on by the Commission), haunted the leadership at the time and was pervasive in the evaluation of the PRACs' work for years to come.
Being all past and all present, the oeuvre lives to the rhythm of literature's apres-coup." (4) So literature, and drama in particular, within the context of our discussion in the present pages, inflicts violence on time in that they exceed "simple presence" as well as "pure present." (5) And the (in)fusionist transcultural now in going beyond the global submits to abandoning both "phantasms: reader's free play as well as historical unicausality," (6) inaugurating a new literary history.