microorganism

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mi·cro·or·gan·ism

 (mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

microorganism

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːɡəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, such as a bacterium, protozoan, or virus, of microscopic size
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mi•cro•or•gan•ism

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈɔr gəˌnɪz əm)

n.
any organism too small to be viewed by the unaided eye, as bacteria or some fungi and algae.
[1875–80]
mi`cro•or•gan′ic
(-ɔrˈgæn ɪk)
adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
An organism that can be seen only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, algae, and fungi. See Note at germ.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

microorganism

any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
See also: Organisms
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microorganism - any organism of microscopic sizemicroorganism - any organism of microscopic size  
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
intestinal flora - harmless microorganisms (as Escherichia coli) that inhabit the intestinal tract and are essential for its normal functioning
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
moneran, moneron - organisms that typically reproduce by asexual budding or fission and whose nutritional mode is absorption or photosynthesis or chemosynthesis
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
microbe, germ, bug - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
protoctist - any of the unicellular protists
protist, protistan - free-living or colonial organisms with diverse nutritional and reproductive modes
pilus - hairlike structure especially on the surface of a cell or microorganism
virulence, virulency - extreme harmfulness (as the capacity of a microorganism to cause disease); "the virulence of the plague"
transmitter, vector - any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
bacteremia, bacteriaemia, bacteriemia - transient presence of bacteria (or other microorganisms) in the blood
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

microorganism

also micro-organism
noun
A minute organism usually producing disease:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
mikroorganismus
mikroorganisme
mikro-organismi
מיקרואורגניזם
mikroorganizam
mikroorganisme
微生物

microorganism

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgənɪzəm] Nmicroorganismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

microorganism

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgəˌnɪzm] nmicroorganismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

n. microorganismo, organismo que no puede verse a simple vista.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

microorganism

n microorganismo, microbio
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The yeast is a unicellular organism roughly 3-15 [micro]m in diameter.
(43) In a paper and a book, Lynn Margulis suggests that mitochondria are derived from a symbiotic union of a unicellular organism and a prokaryote in a process she called endosymbiosis.
In the animal kingdom, how many cells does a unicellular organism have?
The book is based on extensive and recent bibliography, and in eight chapters it describes the evolution of this relationship from the withdrawal reflex of the unicellular organism to the complex social doctor-patient relationship and to the modern medicine evolution.
(51.) Matsuda et al, US 7,238,514 B2, Diterpene producing unicellular organism.
Kutty writes that this excerpt could mean out of the primordial unicellular organism (one living entity) that appeared on earth 3.5 billion years ago and from all living forms including man evolved both male and female (the mates).
These include the unlikelihood of formation of complex self-replicating molecules such as RNA by chance encounters even over geological time; the difficulty of protecting such molecules following their formation from dilution and destruction by high temperatures, hydrolysis and ultraviolet radiation; and finally the difficulty of imagining how self-organization alone could lead to encapsulation of a complex hierarchy of biochemical reactions in a membrane to form the simplest unicellular organism. (9) According to the RNA World Hypothesis, the first living system was a polymer(s) of catalytic RNA capable of self-replication that subsequently evolved the ability to encode more versatile peptide catalysts.
And though I'd never go so far as to ascribe an emotion like joy to a unicellular organism, I also wonder if maybe, just maybe, those tiny algae glow because they're in the right place at the right time.
In abstract, the plan resembles a simple unicellular organism, with a coloured circulation core as its nucleus.
"I haven't a clue if there is life on other planets but I'd be charmed if we found a unicellular organism on Mars.
They studied the fossils of Fusulinidae, a unicellular organism, in a 40-meter-thick layer of limestone in the southwestern Japanese town of Takachiho, Miyazaki Prefecture.
Sleeping sickness is caused by the unicellular organism Trypanosoma brucei that is transmitted by tsetse flies.