Unicode

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U·ni·code

 (yo͞o′nĭ-kōd′)
n.
A character encoding standard for computer storage and transmission of the letters, characters, and symbols of most languages and writing systems.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Unicode

(ˈjuːnɪˌkəʊd)
n
(Computer Science) computing a character set for all languages
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first widely used set of emoji were created for a Japanese mobile phone operator in the late 1990s, and hundreds of emoji were incorporated into the Unicode Standard a decade later.
When a new emoji si created, it may not be a part of the core Unicode standard. What this leads to is an emoji swap.
There are over 3,000 emojis in the Unicode Standard and billions of emojis are used daily in chats.
The Cupertino giant has recently submitted disability-themed emojis for consideration by the Unicode Consortium, the non-profit organization that coordinates the development of the Unicode standard. 
In what follows, we describe the existing literature on text watermarking including architecture, the Unicode standard, text watermarking categories, applications, evaluation criteria, and attacks.
The service allows full customization for the username of an e-mail address to be in any language/script represented in the Unicode standard, and can work with any second level IDN domain name or IDN top-level domain working on the Internet today.
The Unicode Standard is intended to support the needs of all types of users,
Emoji characters are based on the Unicode standard in order to be displayed properly across many platforms.
Unicode standard (UTF-8) comes up with an added advantage that there is no need to install Urdu fonts at the client side.
When the Unicode Standard was introduced, it enabled the use of any glyph for any linguistic particularity.
New characters are being defined on a rapid pace for many regional languages but encoding all of them to the Unicode Standard is inconvenient.