union shop

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Related to Union shop contract: closed shop

union shop

n.
A business or industrial establishment whose employees are required to be union members or to agree to join the union within a specified time after being hired. Also called closed shop.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

union shop

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) (formerly) an establishment whose employment policy is governed by a contract between employer and a trade union permitting the employment of nonunion labour only on the condition that such labour joins the union within a specified time period. Compare open shop, closed shop
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un′ion shop`


n.
a shop, business, etc., in which membership in a union is made a condition of employment, but in which the employer may hire nonunion workers provided that they become members after a stated period, usu. 30 days.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.union shop - a company allowed to hire nonunion workers on the condition that they will join the union within a specified time
company - an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The question is whether public sector employees required by law to join labor unions under union shop contracts, which are in effect in about two dozen states, including Minnesota, may refuse to pay union dues if they disagree with union policies or practices or simply do not want to support the unions to which they must belong.
Workers lack the economic power of corporations to impose their needs on the market, but they have been able to use their solidarity to lobby for protective legislation and immigration restrictions and to negotiate union shop contracts and seniority provisions.

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