Unitarianism

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U·ni·tar·i·an

 (yo͞o′nĭ-târ′ē-ən)
n.
1. An adherent of Unitarian Universalism.
2. A monotheist who is not a Christian.
3. A Christian who is not a Trinitarian.

[From New Latin ūnitārius, monotheist, from Latin ūnitās, unity; see unity.]

U′ni·tar′i·an adj.
U′ni·tar′i·an·ism n.

unitarianism

(ˌjuːnɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any unitary system, esp of government

Unitarianism

(ˌjuːnɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Christian Churches, other) a system of Christian belief that maintains the unipersonality of God, rejects the Trinity and the divinity of Christ, and takes reason, conscience, and character as the criteria of belief and practice
2. (Theology) a system of Christian belief that maintains the unipersonality of God, rejects the Trinity and the divinity of Christ, and takes reason, conscience, and character as the criteria of belief and practice

Unitarianism

the beliefs, principles, and practices of the Unitarian denomination, especially its doctrine that God is one being, and its emphasis upon autonomous congregational government. — Unitarian, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
the doctrines of those, including the Unitarian denomination, who hold that God exists only in one person. Cf. trinitarianism. — unitarian, n.,adj.
See also: Christ
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Unitarianism - Christian doctrine that stresses individual freedom of belief and rejects the TrinityUnitarianism - Christian doctrine that stresses individual freedom of belief and rejects the Trinity
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Translations

Unitarianism

[ˌjuːnɪˈtɛərɪənɪzəm] Nunitarismo m

Unitarianism

nUnitarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
William Hamilton Drummond (1778-1865), poet, Presbyterian minister and Unitarian Christian theologian writes, 'The present state of this unfortunate country is certainly most unfavourable to the muse' (133), and, perhaps surprisingly, questions why Thomson, in a letter dated 29 December 1798, is 'so partial to the Scottish muse' (134).
Moreover, Channing used Abbot's pious demise to champion the liberal cause in his polemical essay, "Objections to Unitarian Christianity Considered," first printed as an article in the November and December 1819 issue of the Unitarian Christian Disciple, then as a pamphlet.
Faith groups like Unitarian Christians who want to perform same sex marriage ceremonies can, and those who don''t want to perform them such as the Roman Catholic Church don''t have to.