upsilon

(redirected from Upsilon (letter))
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

up·si·lon

 (ŭp′sə-lŏn′, yo͞op′-)
n.
The 20th letter of the Greek alphabet. See Table at alphabet.

[Late Greek ū psīlon, simple u (from the fact that oi was given the same pronunciation in Late Greek as u) : ū, hū, the letter U + psīlon, neuter of psīlos, simple (written with one letter as opposed to two).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

upsilon

(ˈʌpsɪˌlɒn; juːpˈsaɪlən)
n
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the 20th letter in the Greek alphabet (Υ, υ), a vowel, transliterated as y or u
[C17: from Medieval Greek u psilon simple u, name adopted for graphic u to avoid confusion with graphic oi, since pronunciation was the same for both in Late Greek]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

up•si•lon

(ˈyup səˌlɒn, -lən, ˈʌp-; esp. Brit. yupˈsaɪ lən)

n.
1. the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet (Y, υ).
2. Also called up′silon par`ticle. any of a family of heavy, short-lived, neutral mesons that are composed of a bottom quark and its antiquark. Symbol:Y, υ
[1615–25; < Late Greek ŷ psīlón literally, simple u (to distinguish it from the diagraph oi, pronounced the same in Late Greek]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.upsilon - the 20th letter of the Greek alphabetupsilon - the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet - the alphabet used by ancient Greeks
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations