uranium

(redirected from Uranium compounds)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Uranium compounds: Triuranium octaoxide

u·ra·ni·um

 (yo͝o-rā′nē-əm)
n. Symbol U
A dense silvery-white metallic element that is radioactive and toxic, is easily oxidized, and has numerous isotopes of which U-238 is the most abundant in nature. The element occurs in several minerals, including uraninite and carnotite, from which it is extracted and processed for use in research, nuclear fuels, and nuclear weapons. Atomic number 92; atomic weight 238.03; melting point 1,135°C; boiling point 4,131°C; specific gravity 19.1; valence 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. See Periodic Table.

[New Latin ūranium, named by German chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who discovered the element in 1789, after New Latin Ūranus, the planet Uranus, discovered in 1781; see Uranus.]

uranium

(jʊˈreɪnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a radioactive silvery-white metallic element of the actinide series. It occurs in several minerals including pitchblende, carnotite, and autunite and is used chiefly as a source of nuclear energy by fission of the radioisotope uranium-235. Symbol: U; atomic no: 92; atomic wt: 238.0289; half-life of most stable isotope, 238U: 451 × 109 years; valency: 2-6; relative density: 18.95 (approx.); melting pt: 1135°C; boiling pt: 4134°C
[C18: from New Latin, from Uranus2; from the fact that the element was discovered soon after the planet]

u•ra•ni•um

(yʊˈreɪ ni əm)

n.
a white, lustrous, radioactive, metallic element, isotopes of which are used in atomic and hydrogen bombs and as a fuel in nuclear reactors. Symbol: U; at. wt.: 238.03; at. no.: 92; sp. gr.: 19.07.
[< German (1790), after the planet Uranus]

u·ra·ni·um

(yo͝o-rā′nē-əm)
Symbol U A heavy, silvery-white, highly toxic, radioactive metallic element of the actinide series. It occurs in several minerals and ores, such as pitchblende. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors to generate electricity. Atomic number 92. See Periodic Table.

uranium

A highly radioactive element used in thermonuclear reactors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.uranium - a heavy toxic silvery-white radioactive metallic elementuranium - a heavy toxic silvery-white radioactive metallic element; occurs in many isotopes; used for nuclear fuels and nuclear weapons
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
uranium 235 - a uranium isotope with mass number 235; capable of sustaining chain reactions
uranium 238 - the commonest isotope of uranium; it is not fissionable but when irradiated with neutrons it produces fissionable plutonium 239
pitchblende, uraninite - a mineral consisting of uranium oxide and trace amounts of radium and thorium and polonium and lead and helium; uraninite in massive form is called pitchblende which is the chief uranium ore
Translations
يورانيوميُورانِيُوم
уран
uran
uran
uranio
uraan
uraani
uranuranij
urán
úranúraníum, úran
ウラニウムウラン
우라늄
uranium
uranas
urāns
uraniumuraan
uraniu
uranurán
uran
uran
ธาตุยูเรเนียม
уран
uranuraniuranium

uranium

[jʊəˈreɪnɪəm] Nuranio m

uranium

[jʊˈreɪnɪəm]
nuranium m
modif [mine, mining, ore, oxide, fuel, enrichment] → d'uranium

uranium

nUran nt

uranium

[jʊəˈreɪnɪəm] nuranio

uranium

(juˈreiniəm) noun
a radioactive element.

uranium

يُورانِيُوم uran uran Uran ουράνιο uranio uraani uranium uran uranio ウラニウム 우라늄 uranium uran uran urânio уран uran ธาตุยูเรเนียม uranyum uranium

uranium

n uranio
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to understand the risk of uranium toxicity to living organisms, scientists need to understand how or if uranium compounds are taken up by aquatic organisms whether through diet, or directly from the waters they live in, and which uranium compounds are most available to living organisms under different environmental conditions, said USGS biologist and lead author of the study, Marie-Nole Croteau.
The use of depleted uranium became politically and environmentally contentious after the use of depleted uranium munitions by the US, UK and other countries during wars in the Persian Gulf and the Balkans raised moral and health questions of uranium compounds left in the soil [48, 49].
Kazatomprom JSC is the national operator of Kazakhstan for the export of uranium and uranium compounds, rare metals, nuclear fuel for nuclear power plants, special equipment, technologies and materials with dual purposes.
Also, the terror group Islamic State has been reported to have in its possession uranium compounds, obtained from Iraq, that can be used in making dirty bombs.
On July 9, the fighter group now known as the Islamic State captured 40 kg of uranium compounds at Mosul University in Iraq.
Ambassador Mohamed Ali Alhakim to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon informing him that "terrorist groups'' took control of about 40 kilograms of uranium compounds at Mosul University which were used in scientific research.
Iraq's UN envoy has appealed for help to "stave off the threat of their use by terrorists in Iraq or abroad", Alahednews reported.EeEeEeEeEe According to Iraq's UN ambassador, Mohamed Ali Alhakim, about 40 kilograms of uranium compounds were kept at Mosul University.
Iraq's UN Ambassador Mohamed Ali Alhakim told UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in a July 8 letter that nearly 40 kg of uranium compounds were kept at the university.