Ursus americanus


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Noun1.Ursus americanus - brown to black North American bearUrsus americanus - brown to black North American bear; smaller and less ferocious than the brown bear
bear - massive plantigrade carnivorous or omnivorous mammals with long shaggy coats and strong claws
Euarctos, genus Euarctos - American black bears; in some classifications not a separate genus from Ursus
cinnamon bear - reddish-brown color phase of the American black bear
References in periodicals archive ?
10:15 - ASSESSMENT OF BLACK BEAR (URSUS AMERICANUS) RESPONSE BEHAVIOR TO HUMAN PRESENCE IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK THROUGH OBSERVATIONAL STUDY.
The American black bear (Ursus americanus) makes an interesting model for studying spatial variation in SSD (Kennedy et al., 2014).
Stermitz, "Chemically mediated foraging preference of black bears (Ursus americanus)," Journal of Mammalogy, vol.
Seasonal migrations of black bears (Ursus americanus): causes and consequences.
American black bear (Ursus americanus), blue nile monkey (Cercopithecus mitis), barbary sheep (Ammotracus lervia), bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and llama (Lama glama) were studied at Giza Zoo, Giza, Egypt.
The American black bear, Ursus americanus, is by far the most widespread bear in the Western Hemisphere and probably the most numerous bear species in the world.
Spatial variation in sexual-size dimorphism of the American black bear (Ursus americanus) in the eastern United States and Canada.
In order to test our theory, we identified four large-bodied carnivores who are either resident or occasional visitors to this part of Nunavut for comparative purposes: the northern tundra wolf {Canis lupus hudsonicus), black bear (Ursus americanus), grizzly bear {Ursus arctos horribilis), and polar bear.
The smallest and most widespread species of bear in North America is the American black bear (Ursus americanus).
In this paper we report an interaction between black bears (Ursus americanus) and Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii).
Blue Elderberry berries are commonly eaten by other large mammals, including American Black Bears (Ursus americanus; Parish and others 1996; Auger and others 2002) and Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni; Kufeld 1973).
From a total of 73 species registered in this review for the Americas, the most studied species were the coyote (84 articles), the puma (55), the black bear Ursus americanus (51), the jaguar Panthera onca (41) and the wolf (38).