usufruct

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u·su·fruct

 (yo͞o′zə-frŭkt′, -sə-)
n.
The right to the use and profits of something belonging to another.

[Late Latin ūsūfrūctus, variant of Latin ūsusfrūctus : ūsus, use; see usual + frūctus, enjoyment; see fruit.]

usufruct

(ˈjuːsjʊˌfrʌkt)
n
(Law) the right to use and derive profit from a piece of property belonging to another, provided the property itself remains undiminished and uninjured in any way
[C17: from Late Latin ūsūfrūctus, from Latin ūsus use + frūctus enjoyment]
ˌusuˈfructuary n, adj

u•su•fruct

(ˈyu zʊˌfrʌkt, -sʊ-, ˈyuz yʊ-, ˈyus-)

n.
the right to enjoy all the advantages of another's property, provided that such property is not destroyed or damaged.
[1620–30; < Late Latin ūsūfrūctus= Latin ūsū, abl. of ūsus use + frūctus (see fruit)]

usufruct

the right to enjoy benefits or profits from something, as real property, while not being the owner of it. — usufructuary, n., ad].
See also: Property and Ownership
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.usufruct - a legal right to use and derive profit from property belonging to someone else provided that the property itself is not injured in any way
legal right - a right based in law
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

usufruct

[ˈjuːzjʊfrʌkt] Nusufructo m

usufruct

n (Jur) → Nutznießung f
References in periodicals archive ?
46) Once vested, the appropriator would have the ability to perpetually use and consume the same quantity of water each year,(47) and the beneficial uses of that water form the boundaries of the claimant's usufructuary right.
In such a circumstance, the treaty language anticipates a gradual reduction in the territory to which the usufructuary right attaches as it is "occupied" or used by non-Indians i.
The source of Aboriginal title was based on the Royal Proclamation of 1763 (supra note 4), giving Aboriginals a "personal and usufructuary right, dependent upon the good will of the Sovereign" and which could be taken away at any time (St.
The liquidator could sell the real estate but the value assessment prolonged the procedure for years and, in addition in favor of the members often usufructuary right for lifetime was recorded into the real estate registration, that is the real estates are non-sellable.
In the 1880s, the Privy Council characterised Indian land 'tenure' as 'a personal and usufructuary right, dependent upon the good will of the sovereign' (the St.
This has often been referred to as a usufructuary right by numerous writers (Appell 1997, Cramb 1986, Ngidang 2000).
stated that the interest of the natives in their land was a "personal and usufructuary right, dependent upon the good will of the Sovereign.
However, she notes, a company "organized as a private enterprise and owned by the Republic of Austria now has sole responsibility for managing the palace, with its contract with Austria based on a usufructuary right.
55] Consequently, the occupier's usufructuary right can arguably only be applied to the extent that it assists the occupant in bearing the expenses of the occupation in a manner consistent with the other restrictions placed on the occupier's use of state-owned property.
at 416 (describing the individual entitlement in fishing TEAs as "in the nature of a usufructuary right," i.
who authored the majority opinion in Delgamuukw, insisted that aboriginal title was not equivalent to a usufructuary right to engage in traditional aboriginal practices: