usufruct

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u·su·fruct

 (yo͞o′zə-frŭkt′, -sə-)
n.
The right to the use and profits of something belonging to another.

[Late Latin ūsūfrūctus, variant of Latin ūsusfrūctus : ūsus, use; see usual + frūctus, enjoyment; see fruit.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

usufruct

(ˈjuːsjʊˌfrʌkt)
n
(Law) the right to use and derive profit from a piece of property belonging to another, provided the property itself remains undiminished and uninjured in any way
[C17: from Late Latin ūsūfrūctus, from Latin ūsus use + frūctus enjoyment]
ˌusuˈfructuary n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

u•su•fruct

(ˈyu zʊˌfrʌkt, -sʊ-, ˈyuz yʊ-, ˈyus-)

n.
the right to enjoy all the advantages of another's property, provided that such property is not destroyed or damaged.
[1620–30; < Late Latin ūsūfrūctus= Latin ūsū, abl. of ūsus use + frūctus (see fruit)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

usufruct

the right to enjoy benefits or profits from something, as real property, while not being the owner of it. — usufructuary, n., ad].
See also: Property and Ownership
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.usufruct - a legal right to use and derive profit from property belonging to someone else provided that the property itself is not injured in any way
legal right - a right based in law
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

usufruct

[ˈjuːzjʊfrʌkt] Nusufructo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

usufruct

n (Jur) → Nutznießung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The Privy Council went on to hold that the Ojibway held only "a personal and usufructuary right" to the land which was "dependent upon the goodwill of the sovereign" (52) and which amounted to a "burden" on underlying Crown title.
and traditions of Native Americans and previous Spanish colonizers to develop the law of appropriation,(43) which seventeen western states adopted.(44) Any water on public lands was subject to appropriation by someone who wanted to put the water to beneficial use.(45) Rights would vest once actual work was completed to divert the water to where it was needed.(46) Once vested, the appropriator would have the ability to perpetually use and consume the same quantity of water each year,(47) and the beneficial uses of that water form the boundaries of the claimant's usufructuary right.(48) Critically, if the appropriator stopped putting the water to that beneficial use, then the appropriation right was lost under a "use it or lose it" principle.(49)
In such a circumstance, the treaty language anticipates a gradual reduction in the territory to which the usufructuary right attaches as it is "occupied" or used by non-Indians i.e.
The liquidator could sell the real estate but the value assessment prolonged the procedure for years and, in addition in favor of the members often usufructuary right for lifetime was recorded into the real estate registration, that is the real estates are non-sellable.
In the 1880s, the Privy Council characterised Indian land 'tenure' as 'a personal and usufructuary right, dependent upon the good will of the sovereign' (the St.
stated that the interest of the natives in their land was a "personal and usufructuary right, dependent upon the good will of the Sovereign." (45) These normative obligations later gave rise to fiduciary duties.
R., Lord Watson wrote that the tenure of the Indians was a personal and usufructuary right. (160) This narrow view of Aboriginal title largely prevailed through the first one hundred years of Canada's history.
However, she notes, a company "organized as a private enterprise and owned by the Republic of Austria now has sole responsibility for managing the palace, with its contract with Austria based on a usufructuary right."
Nevertheless, the general intent behind the Hague Regulations, according to the Preamble of the Hague Convention itself, is "to dimini sh the evils of war; as far as military requirements permit." [55] Consequently, the occupier's usufructuary right can arguably only be applied to the extent that it assists the occupant in bearing the expenses of the occupation in a manner consistent with the other restrictions placed on the occupier's use of state-owned property.