uterus

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Related to Uterine diseases: endometriosis, adenomyosis

u·ter·us

 (yo͞o′tər-əs)
n. pl. u·ter·i (yo͞o′tə-rī′) or u·ter·us·es
1. A hollow muscular organ located in the pelvic cavity of female mammals in which the fertilized egg implants and develops. Also called womb.
2. A corresponding part in other animals.

[Middle English, from Latin.]

uterus

(ˈjuːtərəs)
n, pl uteri (ˈjuːtəˌraɪ)
1. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) anatomy a hollow muscular organ lying within the pelvic cavity of female mammals. It houses the developing fetus and by contractions aids in its expulsion at parturition. Nontechnical name: womb
2. (Zoology) the corresponding organ in other animals
[C17: from Latin; compare Greek hustera womb, hoderos belly, Sanskrit udara belly]

u•ter•us

(ˈyu tər əs)

n., pl. u•ter•i (ˈyu təˌraɪ) u•ter•us•es.
a hollow expandable organ of female placental mammals in which the fertilized egg develops during pregnancy; womb.
[1605–15; < Latin: the womb]

u·ter·us

(yo͞o′tər-əs)
The hollow, muscular organ of female mammals to which a fertilized egg attaches before developing into an embryo. In most mammals the uterus is divided into two sac-like parts, whereas in humans it is a single structure. It lies between the bladder and rectum and is attached to the vagina and the fallopian tubes. Also called womb. See more at menstrual cycle.

uterus

- From the Latin word meaning "belly, womb."
See also related terms for womb.

uterus

(or womb) A hollow muscular organ in females, above the bladder. Inside it, a fertilized ovum develops into a baby.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.uterus - a hollow muscular organ in the pelvic cavity of femalesuterus - a hollow muscular organ in the pelvic cavity of females; contains the developing fetus
cervix uteri, uterine cervix, cervix - necklike opening to the uterus
arteria uterina, uterine artery - a branch of the internal iliac artery that supplies the uterus and the upper part of the vagina
venter - the womb; "`in venter' is legal terminology for `conceived but not yet born'"
female reproductive system - the reproductive system of females
female internal reproductive organ - the reproductive organs of a woman
Fallopian tube, oviduct, uterine tube - either of a pair of tubes conducting the egg from the ovary to the uterus
uterine cavity - the space inside the uterus between the cervical canal and the Fallopian tubes
endometrium - (pregnancy) the mucous membrane that lines the uterus; thickens under hormonal control and (if pregnancy does not occur) is shed in menstruation; if pregnancy occurs it is shed along with the placenta at parturition
myometrium - the smooth muscle forming the wall of the uterus
placenta - the vascular structure in the uterus of most mammals providing oxygen and nutrients for and transferring wastes from the developing fetus
Translations
رَحْم
děloha
livmor
anyaméh
leg
gimda
dzemde
maternica

uterus

[ˈjuːtərəs] N (uteri (pl)) [ˈjuːtəraɪ]útero m

uterus

[ˈjuːtərəs] nutérus m

uterus

nGebärmutter f, → Uterus m (spec)

uterus

[ˈjuːtərəs] nutero

uterus

(ˈjuːtərəs) noun
the womb.

u·ter·us

n. útero, matriz, órgano muscular femenino del aparato reproductivo que contiene y nutre al embrión y al feto durante la gestación;
___ gravis___ grávido, condición durante el embarazo;
didelphys ______ didelfo.

uterus

n (pl -ri) útero, matriz f
References in periodicals archive ?
Methods: One hundred and fifty patients with endometrial cancer who were admitted to Binzhou People's Hospital, Shandong, China, between June 2013 and July 2014, were enrolled and set as an endometrial cancer group; another one hundred patients with benign uterine diseases and one hundred healthy females were also enrolled.
Risk factors for uterine diseases on small- and medium-sized dairy farms determined by clinical, bacteriological, and cytological examinations.
Role of hysterectomy and its alternatives in benign uterine diseases.
3 Hysterectomy is the definitive treatment for many uterine diseases as well as diseases of the fallopian tubes and adnexae.
Moreover, failure of cervix to dilate properly may be due to uterine inertia, metritis, birth weight of calf, injuries of cervix in previous parturition, and infectious uterine diseases, debility and debilitating diseases (Roberts, 1971) and in older cows due to loss of tonicity of uterus or loss of contracting ability of uterus during parturition.