uti possidetis


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uti possidetis

(ˈjuːtaɪ ˌpɒsɪˈdiːtɪs)
n
(Law) international law the rule that territory and other property remains in the hands of the belligerent state actually in possession at the end of a war unless otherwise provided for by treaty
[from Latin, literally: as you possess]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"Their borders were recognized on the basis of the "uti possidetis" principle, which confirms the territory of two countries within the borders of the Azerbaijani and Armenian Soviet Socialist Republics, where Nagorno-Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan."
However, Pakistani governments have continuously maintained that the Durand Line is the legal border between the two countries due to international law principle of Uti possidetis juris.
Ominously, the British proposed that treaty language include two Latin words: uti possidetis, which means "as you possess." The proposal meant that the land held by each side at the time of ratification of the treaty would remain with its possessor.
Uti possidetis is a principle in international law which stipulates that newly formed sovereign states should have the same borders that their preceding dependent area had before independence.
(5) The principle of the stability and continuity of boundaries also manifested itself in the strict application of the uti possidetis doctrine, which entailed that, in the case of a dissolution of a single colonial empire (or a federal republic) into several independent states, the internal administrative boundaries of the former were maintained as the international boundaries of the latter.
Se ha discutido tambien en diversos casos planteados ante la Corte Internacional de Justicia, en particular en los de Burkina Faso/Mali (35), Benin/ Niger (36) y Burkina Fasso/Niger (37), donde se invoco la aplicacion de un principio inspirado en el uti possidetis iuris.
Finally, the idea of state sovereignty is reflected in another doctrine of international law- the principle of uti possidetis. According to uti possidetis, "states emerging from decolonization shall presumptively inherit the colonial administrative borders that they held at the time of independence." (39) Uti possidetis thus protects existing colonial borders from change, by elevating them to the status of international borders.
More specifically, topics include uti possidetis, initiatives in the early years at the United Nations, US Latinos, patterns of protest and revolution (1810-1910-2010), Latin American forests, growth driven by external demand, and NAFTA.