utility

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Related to Utility theory: Marginal utility theory

u·til·i·ty

 (yo͞o-tĭl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. u·til·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being useful; usefulness: "I have always doubted the utility of these conferences on disarmament" (Winston S. Churchill).
2. A useful article or device.
3.
a. A public utility.
b. A commodity or service, such as electricity, water, or public transportation, that is provided by a public utility.
4. Computers A utility program.
5. Economics The benefit that a chosen course of action affords, as subjectively judged by the chooser.
adj.
1. Used, serving, or working in several capacities as needed, especially:
a. Prepared to play any of the smaller theatrical roles on short notice: a utility cast member.
b. Capable of playing as a substitute in any of several positions: a utility infielder.
2. Designed for various often heavy-duty practical uses: a utility knife; a utility vehicle.
3. Raised or kept for the production of a farm product rather than for show or as pets: utility livestock.
4. Of the lowest US Government grade: utility beef.

[Middle English utilite, from Old French, from Latin ūtilitās, from ūtilis, useful, from ūtī, to use.]

utility

(juːˈtɪlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the quality of practical use; usefulness; serviceability
b. (as modifier): a utility fabric.
2. something useful
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. a public service, such as the bus system; public utility
b. (as modifier): utility vehicle.
4. (Economics) economics
a. the ability of a commodity to satisfy human wants
b. the amount of such satisfaction. See disutility
5. (Statistics) statistics
a. a measure of the total benefit or disadvantage attaching to each of a set of alternative courses of action
b. (as modifier): utility function. See also expected utility, decision theory
6. (Automotive Engineering) Also called: utility truck or ute (informal)Austral and NZ a small truck with an open body and low sides, often with a removable tarpaulin cover; pick-up
7. (Computer Science) a piece of computer software designed for a routine task, such as examining or copying files
[C14: from Old French utelite, from Latin ūtilitās usefulness, from ūtī to use]

u•til•i•ty

(yuˈtɪl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties,
adj. n.
1. the state or quality of being useful; usefulness.
2. something useful; a useful thing.
3. a public service, as the providing of electricity, gas, water, a telephone system, or bus and railroad lines.
5. Often, utilities. a useful or advantageous factor or feature.
6. the capacity of a commodity or a service to satisfy some human want.
8. utilities, stocks or bonds of public utilities.
adj.
9. (of domestic animals) raised or kept as potentially profitable products rather than for show or as pets.
10. designed for a number of practical purposes rather than a single, specialized one: a utility knife.
11. capable of serving in any of various capacities: a utility player on a baseball team.
12. designed chiefly for use or service rather than beauty, high quality, etc.: utility furniture.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French < Latin ūtil(is) useful]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utility - a company that performs a public service; subject to government regulation
service - a company or agency that performs a public service; subject to government regulation
phone company, phone service, telco, telephone company, telephone service - a public utility that provides telephone service
electric company, light company, power company, power service - a public utility that provides electricity
water company, waterworks - a public utility that provides water
gas company, gas service - a public utility that provides gas
bus company, bus service - a public utility providing local transportation
2.utility - the quality of being of practical useutility - the quality of being of practical use
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
detergence, detergency - detergent quality; the quality of having cleansing power
function, purpose, use, role - what something is used for; "the function of an auger is to bore holes"; "ballet is beautiful but what use is it?"
helpfulness - the property of providing useful assistance
use - a particular service; "he put his knowledge to good use"; "patrons have their uses"
serviceability, serviceableness, usability, usableness, useableness - the quality of being able to provide good service
instrumentality - the quality of being instrumental for some purpose
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
practicability, practicableness - the quality of being usable
inutility, unusefulness, uselessness - the quality of having no practical use
3.utility - the service (electric power or water or transportation) provided by a public utilityutility - the service (electric power or water or transportation) provided by a public utility; "the cost of utilities never decreases"; "all the utilities were lost after the hurricane"
service - work done by one person or group that benefits another; "budget separately for goods and services"
4.utility - (economics) a measure that is to be maximized in any situation involving choice
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
system of measurement, metric - a system of related measures that facilitates the quantification of some particular characteristic
marginal utility - (economics) the amount that utility increases with an increase of one unit of an economic good or service
5.utility - (computer science) a program designed for general support of the processes of a computerutility - (computer science) a program designed for general support of the processes of a computer; "a computer system provides utility programs to perform the tasks needed by most users"
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
computer program, computer programme, programme, program - (computer science) a sequence of instructions that a computer can interpret and execute; "the program required several hundred lines of code"
device driver, driver - (computer science) a program that determines how a computer will communicate with a peripheral device
diagnostic program - a program that recognizes and explains faults in the equipment or mistakes in a computer program
input program - a utility program that organizes the input to a computer
output program - a utility program that organizes the output of a computer
sort program, sorting program - a utility program that sorts data items
trace program - a utility program that exhibits the sequence and results of executing the instructions in another program
service routine, utility routine - a routine that can be used as needed
6.utility - a facility composed of one or more pieces of equipment connected to or part of a structure and designed to provide a service such as heat or electricity or water or sewage disposalutility - a facility composed of one or more pieces of equipment connected to or part of a structure and designed to provide a service such as heat or electricity or water or sewage disposal; "the price of the house included all utilities"
electrical plant, electrical system - utility that provides electricity
facility, installation - a building or place that provides a particular service or is used for a particular industry; "the assembly plant is an enormous facility"
heating plant, heating system, heating, heat - utility to warm a building; "the heating system wasn't working"; "they have radiant heating"
plumbing, plumbing system - utility consisting of the pipes and fixtures for the distribution of water or gas in a building and for the disposal of sewage
Adj.1.utility - used of beef; usable but inferior
inferior - of low or inferior quality
2.utility - capable of substituting in any of several positions on a team; "a utility infielder"
secondary - being of second rank or importance or value; not direct or immediate; "the stone will be hauled to a secondary crusher"; "a secondary source"; "a secondary issue"; "secondary streams"

utility

noun usefulness, use, point, benefit, service, profit, fitness, convenience, mileage (informal), avail, practicality, efficacy, advantageousness, serviceableness He inwardly questioned the utility of his work.

utility

noun
The quality of being suitable or adaptable to an end:
Translations
مَصْلَحَة خِدْمَة عامَّهمَنْفَعَه، فائِدَه
užitečnostužitekslužby
anvendelighedydelse
kasulikkus
hyödykehyödyllisyyspalvelu
közmû
almenningsòjónustufyrirtækigagnsemi, nytsemi
komunalinė paslaugautilitarinis
derīgumspielietojums
úžitokverejné služby
faydakamu hizmetiyarar

utility

[juːˈtɪlɪtɪ]
A. N
1. (= usefulness) → utilidad f
2. (also public utility) → servicio m público
B. CPDutilitario
utility player N (Sport) → jugador(a) m/f polivalente
utility room Nlavadero m
utility vehicle Nfurgoneta f, camioneta f

utility

[juːˈtɪləti] n
(= usefulness) → utilité f
(also public utility) → service m publicutility room nbuanderie futility vehicle nvéhicule m utilitaire

utility

n
(= usefulness)Nützlichkeit f, → Nutzen m
public utility (= company)Versorgungsbetrieb m; (= service)Leistung fder Versorgungsbetriebe; the utilitiesversorgungswirtschaftliche Einrichtungen pl
(Comput) → Utility nt, → Hilfs- or Dienstprogramm nt
(Austral: = utility vehicle) → Kleintransporter m
attr utility industryVersorgungsindustrie f; utility goodsGebrauchsgüter pl; utility furniture im 2. Weltkrieg in Großbritannien hergestellte Möbel, die einfach, aber zweckmäßig waren

utility

:
utility box
n (for nails, screws etc) → Kleinteilemagazin nt
utility company
nVersorgungsbetrieb m
utility man
n (US) → Mädchen ntfür alles (inf)
utility player
n (Sport) → Spieler, der/Spielerin, die auf mehreren Positionen spielen kann
utility program
n (Comput) → Hilfsprogramm nt, → Dienstprogramm nt
utility room
nAllzweckraum m
utility software
n (Comput) → Hilfssoftware f, → Utility-Software f
utility vehicle

utility

[juːˈtɪlɪtɪ] n (usefulness) → utilità (also public utility) → servizio pubblico

utility

(juˈtiləti) plural uˈtilities noun
1. usefulness. Some kitchen gadgets have only a limited utility.
2. a useful public service, eg the supply of water, gas, electricity etc.
uˌtiliˈtarian adjective
useful rather than ornamental. Our plates and glasses are utilitarian rather than beautiful.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are the near disappearance of concepts in mainstream sociology, the study of consumption in sociology: beyond utility theory, the family and interwoven concepts, the status of the political in the concept of class structure, and recognition: conceptualization and context.
Riedener provides a representation theorem for the case of axiological uncertainty, analogous to the theorems of expected utility theory for empirical uncertainty.
In microeconomics, the theory of the firm holds that businesses should operate to maximize profits, and in traditional economic analysis, marginal utility theory and principles of diminishing marginal utility dictate that profitability is mathematically maximized at the price and production level where marginal revenues equal marginal costs.
Primarily, a set of common factors is purely founded on model of economic, where Expected Utility theory (EUT) where the variable of psychological factor explains behavior of farmers for instant to adopt GFT.
An example of heuristics within the context of demand-based pricing is transaction utility theory.
Successful professional gamblers work not with serial, discrete yes/no decisions, but with odds and investments, probability and ambiguity, for which utility theory is not an adequate model.
The theory of stochastic orders is closely related to expected utility theory, pioneered by the influential work of von Neumann and Morgenstern (1944).
In response to these problems, this paper first introduces utility theory to achieve an efficient allocation of fault tasks, divides fault level, and develops repairing principle.
MPT uses assumptions of von Neumann and Morgenstern's expected utility theory (Von Neumann and Morgenstern, 1944).
The research resulted in a new innovated theory that combines the philosophical comparative approach to probability, the frequency interpretation of probability, dynamic Bayesian networks and the expected utility theory.
As a result, scholars have proposed many alternatives to explain the deviations from expected utility theory.
Importantly, the presence of inconsistency does not mean error on the part of the respondents, but implies only that their preferences are inconsistent with what the Expected Utility Theory predicts.