Uvedale


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Uvedale

(ˈjuːdəl; ˈjuːvˌdeɪl)
n
(Biography) a variant of (Nicholas) Udall
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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He notes for example how visitors moving through the house encounter fresh and constantly shifting views "that unexpectedly burst upon the spectator, so as to fascinate him with delight." (13) This bringing "indoors" of the picturesque foregrounds an emphasis on the interior to which occluded landscapes, favored by theorists such as Richard Payne Knight and Uvedale Price, ultimately tended: in certain scenes, as Ann Bermingham has remarked, we travel through the "rich interiors of their convoluted and broken forms." (14) This attention to the inside may be related to how the domestic interior emerged in the nineteenth century as a "new topos of subjective interiority," in the work of Walter Benjamin, among others.
Austen may also have been thinking of landscape theorist Uvedale Price's use of the term "intricacy" in An Essay on the Picturesque, as Compared with the Sublime and the Beautiful: "intricacy in landscape might be defined, that disposition of objects which, by a partial and uncertain concealment, excites and nourishes curiosity" (17-18).
Uvedale, accompanied by an engraving, of a Roman tessellated pavement which was discovered at Louth, Lincolnshire.
Dion Liam Nasir, 24, of Uvedale Road, Middlesbrough, banned from driving for 18 months and fined PS110 with PS105 costs for drink-driving.
Prefaced by earlier studies of the Price family's landscaping of their Herefordshire estate (most notably through the catalogue to the 1994 exhibition marking the centenary of Uvedale Price's Essay on the Picturesque), in 2006 the Walpole Society published Watkins and Cowell's edited volume of Price's correspondence.
Furthermore, a common aesthetic register of topographical poetry is the picturesque, and as John Barrell has shown, in his discussion of landscape in eighteenth-century literature; the aesthetic techniques of French/Italian Claude Lorrain (1600-82) and other European picturesque landscape painters were increasingly adopted, domestically, by English writers like Thomas Gray, William Gilpin, Richard Payne Knight, and Uvedale Price.
The picturesque as Betjeman and Piper understood it was not exactly that of the eighteenth-century theorists William Gilpin and Uvedale Price.
Uvedale Price (1747-1829); decoding the picturesque.
While privileging the ruinous and 'down at heel', the picturesque's concern with re-framing the landscape mirrored the fashion for improvement, evident in the dual avocations of landowner-theorists like Uvedale Price and Paine Knight.
It was only when he met Uvedale Price (1747-1829), theorist of the picturesque, that he broke with the box and began to explore the possibilities of irregularity.
Over 20 years they created a garden in the romantic and picturesque styles influenced by William Gilpin and Uvedale Price, reshaping the Cufflymen into a series of cascades and pools.