V-2


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V-2

(vē′to͞o′)
n.
A long-range liquid-fuel rocket used by the Germans as a ballistic missile in World War II.

[German Vergeltungswaffe zwei, retaliation weapon (number) two.]

V-2

n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a rocket-powered ballistic missile invented by the Germans in World War II: used esp to bombard London. It used ethanol as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer
[see V-1]

V-2

(ˈviˈtu)

n., pl. V-2's.
a rocket-powered ballistic missile, used by the Germans late in World War II.
References in periodicals archive ?
The V-2 rocket camera's image is distinct from the air balloon shots in another important way: It was taken high enough to see the dark void of space in which Earth spins.
The engineering of both the V-1 (168 attacks) and V-2 fascinated me post-war.
The scientist was also far more aware of atrocious conditions in the V-2 factory than he would later admit, Biddle contends.
Chun presents case studies of their use in World War II (like the V-2), the Cold War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Iraq's conflicts with Iran, the 1991 Persian Gulf War, and the US development of ballistic missiles.
There prisoners were put to work in a huge underground factory, building V-2 rockets.
One problem was that Goddard generally worked alone, while the Germans, who by 1944 would be firing the large V-2 rocket hundreds of miles, had entire engineering teams working on each component.
Seven virescent strains V-2, ([v.sub.2][v.sub.2]), V-4, ([v.sub.4][v.sub.4]), V-9, ([v.sub.9][v.sub.9]), V-10, ([v.sub.10][v.sub.10]), V-12, ([v.sub.12][v.sub.12]), V-14, ([v.sub.14][v.sub.14]), and V-16, 17, ([v.sub.16][v.sub.16][v.sub.17][v.sub.17]), and 21 [F.sub.2] combinations from crosses among them and the homoelogous virescent strains V-1, ([v.sub.1][v.sub.1]) and V-7, ([v.sub.7][v.sub.7]) were produced at College Station, TX.
After Germany had developed the V-2 rocket during World War II, both the United States and the Soviet Union began to think of placing a rocket in orbit.
Pynchon's monumental third novel might have been entitled V-2, for not only does it develop narrative voices, themes, and structural innovations introduced in Pynchon's first novel, V (1963), but it even adopts two major characters, Seaman Bodine and Lieutenant Weissmann, from the earlier work.
The team realised in April 1944 that they had been looking at the shadow of a V-2 stood vertically with no visible support structure.
Immediately after the war, Wernher von Braun brought several V-2 rockets to a proving ground in White Sands, N.M.
This chapter starts with the story of the Germans' V-2 and then segues to the Soviet postwar program, also beneficiaries of the German V-2 experience.