Abilene

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Ab·i·lene

 (ăb′ə-lēn′)
1. A city of central Kansas west of Topeka. From 1867, when the railroad arrived, until 1871, it was a major shipping point for Texas cattle.
2. A city of west-central Texas west-southwest of Fort Worth. Founded in 1881 with the coming of the railroad, the city first prospered as a shipping center for cattle.

Abilene

(ˈæbɪˌliːn)
n
(Placename) a city in central Texas. Pop: 114 889 (2003 est)

Ab•i•lene

(ˈæb əˌlin)

n.
a city in central Texas. 108,476.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Abilene - a city in central TexasAbilene - a city in central Texas    
Lone-Star State, Texas, TX - the second largest state; located in southwestern United States on the Gulf of Mexico
2.Abilene - a town in central Kansas to the west of TopekaAbilene - a town in central Kansas to the west of Topeka; home of Dwight D. Eisenhower
Kansas, KS, Sunflower State - a state in midwestern United States
References in periodicals archive ?
This is confirmed by the difficult differential diagnosis between these histological appearance and lesions, such as inverted papilloma, VBNs, cystitis cystica and nephrogenic metaplasia.[sup.7] Nest-like structures are the cardinal lesion of both benign and malignant entities that can be misdiagnosed as nested variant bladder carcinoma.
Network connections with these characteristics are already available in vBNS (Very high performance backbone network service--http://www.vbns.net/) and will soon be available in the general Internet.
This site describes the overall mission for the project, with other sections covering vBNS at MU (Very High-Speed Backbone Network at Missouri University-Columbia) and an Internet2 overview.
It will also make teleimmersive collaborative sessions over the National Science Foundation's very high speed Backbone Network Service (vBNS) possible with other Alliance sites using similar visual supercomputers.
The LCSE team plans to apply this latency strategy to enable separated computing resources connected by the new National Science Foundation vBNS (very-high-speed Backbone Network System) to cooperate on the solution of single, tightly coupled, grand challenge applications.
Meanwhile, the government has started a new experimental research network under the auspices of the NSF called the Very High Speed Backbone Network Service (vBNS), which will continue to connect the supercomputer sites and provide the testbed for new "very high speed" network operations.(1)