virtual particle

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virtual particle

n.
A subatomic particle that is allowed by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to exist for a short period of time, but whose continued existence would violate the principle of conservation of energy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The idea of considering the quantum vacuum fluctuations was suggested [6] to solve the cosmological constant problem at present.
Vacuum fluctuations of a scalar field in a rectangular waveguide.
In this experiment, the squeezed vacuum field is the bottleneck that leads to a redistribution of vacuum fluctuations, which can either slow down - if they are behind the bottleneck - or speed up - if they are ahead.
I do not want to amble in relativistic fields of creation and annihilation operators, and vacuum fluctuations, spontaneous emmission and Lamb shifts.
"The reason why the atom "dies," that is it returns to its original ground state, is that it sees the very small variations in the electromagnetic field which must exist due to quantum theory, known as vacuum fluctuations," says GE[micro]ran Johansson, Professor of Theoretical and Applied Quantum Physics and leader of the theory group.
Abstract: We investigate the effect of entanglement between two causally separated open charts in de Sitter space on the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. We consider a free massive scalar field, and construct the reduced density matrix by tracing out the vacuum state for one of the open charts, as recently derived by Maldacena and Pimentel.
It's confirmed: Matter is merely vacuum fluctuations:
"This is the first device in which you get a mechanical action as a result of vacuum fluctuations," says Federico Capasso of Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs in Murray Hill.
The problem with the liquid-ring pumps was constant vacuum fluctuations that were affecting product quality, Stephens says.
But as a counterexample to (1'), Smith's use of such vacuum fluctuations is highly misleading.