vasovagal syncope

(redirected from Vagal response)
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Related to Vagal response: vagus nerve, Vagal episode, Vasovagal Syndrome

vasovagal syncope

(ˌveɪzəʊˈveɪɡəl)
n
(Pathology) a faint brought on by excessive activity of the vagus nerve, causing the heart to slow and the blood pressure to fall. It can be caused by fear, choking, or stomach cramps and has no lasting effects
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

va·so·va·gal syn·co·pe

n. síncope vasovagal, desmayo súbito breve debido a un trastorno vasomotor y vagal.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The mean RR values are correlated to HF power in the frequency domain, which represents vagal response. [9] During this study, the mean RR values were increased in the 1st trimester and then gradually decreases to 3rd trimester, as per heart rate increased progressively throughout the pregnancy and reached a peak during the 3rd trimester, [10] thus suggesting that the increase in the parasympathetic activity in the first trimester.
It is our opinion that the sudden onset severe bradycardia in our patient shortly after chest tube placement was most likely due to either a vagal response to pain or direct stimulation of a branch of the left vagus nerve within the thorax.
It is known that with advancing age there is the tendency to decrease the vagal response with a decrease in HRV (12), but this behavior does not seem to be the case among young athletes (18,29,31).
Each vagal response of ganglionated plexi to high frequency stimulation is recorded before and after procedure and the results are compared to assess if ganglionated plexus activity was modified.
Townend, "Cardiac vagal response to water ingestion in normal human subjects," Clinical Science, vol.
Certain foods such as carbonated drinks which are known to distend gastric lumen and triggering vagal response and resulting bradycardia should be avoided [2].
Initially in the HPS, the patient experiences a vagal response while straining to have a bowel movement, with a corresponding drop in heart rate and blood pressure.
These signs were noted during the needle placement through foramen ovale and attributed to vagal response. Activation of the vagal tone reflex may have been induced by stimulation of the dura mater during cannula placement.
Effective CVTS stimulation response was defined as: the sinus arrest lasting >2 seconds or complete atrioventricular AV block, or a 50% reduction in heart rate was used as the definition of adequate vagal response. The effective CVTS stimulation response was kept constantly during entire experiment.
Prevention of the hyperdynamic cardiac contraction can trigger an abnormal baroreceptor reflex and block the efferent limb of the vagal response to counter the bradycardia and vasodepressor response.
(49) Duke et al confirmed these data in an immature canine model, and they found evidence that a vagal response from a chemoreceptor probably induced laryngospasm and diaphragmatic arrest in immature canine larynges.