Valdemar II


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Valdemar II

n
(Biography) See Waldemar II
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Although Archbishop Anders Sunesen (Archbishop 1201-1223) and King Valdemar II (1202-1241) must have planned their Estonian campaigns already back in 1206, Saxo was unable to include the Danish victories in Estonia, without altering the entire content of his work.
Saxo delivers a short tribute to King Valdemar II "the Victorious", but he goes into explicit detail when he deals with his older brother King Knud IV.
In a papal bull from October 9th 1218, (13) Pope Honorius III declared that he agreed to the written wishes of King Valdemar II, including leaving the Danish King in sovereignty of all territory, but also whatever church which he might manage to erect, and to tear land out of the pagans' hands while taking care that the pagans will see the true light, to which until now they had been blind.
In the aftermath of an Estonian uprising, quenched by the Swordbrethren, the Brethren had forced out the royal Danish administration by taking advantage of the Danish King Valdemar II's kidnapping and imprisonment by a dissatisfied German vassal, who quickly enjoyed support by a major league of the King's German enemies.
The treaty of Stensby (14) in 1238 near the navy base and favourite royal castle at Vordingborg on the southern tip of Zealand (Sjaelland) was signed and sealed by both the Preceptor of the Teutonic Order, the papal legate, the Danish King Valdemar II, Eric, his new heir to the throne, and two other sons, who were accompanied by his faithful vassals, count Albert of Orlamunde and count Ernst, and in the presence of witnesses of the Danish bishops, and representatives of convents and of the Danish nobility.
The old King Valdemar II emphasised the same line in order to secure his and his successors' right to choose the future Bishops of Tallinn in a charter of 15 September 1240.
In the prologue to the charter, later known as the Valdemar-Erician Law the King referred to rights presumably issued orally by his predecessor to the Danish throne, King Valdemar II, which he himself had stated in writing and further supplemented.
King Valdemar II is commemorated for the conversion of Estonia, but in this version the efforts of others were not forgotten, including Danes and Wends, bishops, Danish noblemen, knights, esquires and other good men.