valued policy

(redirected from Valued Form)
Also found in: Legal, Financial.

val·ued policy

 (văl′yo͞od)
n.
An insurance policy requiring the insurer to pay the insured the full face value of the policy in the event of total loss, regardless of the actual value of the lost property.

valued policy

n
(Insurance) an insurance policy in which the amount payable in the event of a valid claim is agreed upon between the company and policyholder when the policy is issued and is not related to the actual value of a loss. Compare open policy
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
To begin with, poetry and not prose is the dominant and more valued form of expression in Urdu literature.
In visiting the museum, which is an unusual and innovative space, it becomes apparent why this visionary artist re-established hand craftsmanship as a highly valued form.
Paper cutting is a valued form of Japanese folk art--many Notan pieces are collaged, not painted.
Hawkins argues that the ABC has an historical advantage in making publics, and that this is exploited and experimented with on Q&A, where the incorporation of tweets has contributed to the emergence of very hybridised regimes of value, and where rational debate is not the only valued form of publicness.
In another persepective on delivering education, two seasoned veterans at the Air Command and Staff College, Kathleen Mahoney-Norris and John Ackerman, take us through how the college's distance learning experience is an increasingly accepted and valued form of delivering high-quality graduate military education to warriors around the world.
Beautiful writing, as the word calligraphy means according to its Greek origins, is a highly valued form of art in many cultures around the globe and especially in the Arab world.
But the creation of knowledge did not change radically until the 1900s, when results of formal clinical studies began to supplant experts' opinions as the most valued form of knowledge.
Gilley reasons that the eruption of antidemocratic social values suggests a weak adherence to a universally valued form of government (the contemporary world is characterized by a remarkable convergence on shared legitimacy norms).
Some of us speak stigmatized or marginalized dialects and languages, while others speak the valued form, yet most of us communicate effectively in our subgroup.
As with all medals and ribbons, these have little material value but the sacrifice, service, and valor that they represent are the most valued form of recognition among Soldiers.