vampire

(redirected from Vampyre)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

vam·pire

 (văm′pīr′)
n.
1. In popular folklore, an undead being in human form that survives by sucking the blood of living people, especially at night.
2. A person, such as an extortionist, who takes advantage of others, especially for personal gain.
3. A vampire bat.

[French, from German Vampir, of Slavic origin.]

vam·pir′ic (văm-pĭr′ĭk), vam·pir′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl), vam′pir′ish (-ĭsh) adj.

vampire

(ˈvæmpaɪə)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) (in European folklore) a corpse that rises nightly from its grave to drink the blood of the living
2. (Animals) See vampire bat
3. a person who preys mercilessly upon others, such as a blackmailer
4. See vamp11
5. (Theatre) theatre a trapdoor on a stage
[C18: from French, from German Vampir, from Magyar; perhaps related to Turkish uber witch, Russian upyr vampire]
vampiric, ˈvampirish adj

vam•pire

(ˈvæm paɪər)

n.
1.
a. (in E European folklore) a corpse, animated by an undeparted soul or a demon, that periodically leaves the grave and disturbs the living.
b. any of various popular or literary representations of the folkloric vampire, typically a being that sucks the blood of sleeping persons at night.
2. a person who preys ruthlessly upon others.
3. a woman who seduces and exploits men.
[1725–35; (< French) < German Vampir < Serbo-Croatian vàmpīr]
vam•pir′ic (-ˈpɪr ɪk) vam′pir•ish, adj.

vampire

A corpse that returns to life at night to suck people’s blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vampire - (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the livingvampire - (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the living
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
evil spirit - a spirit tending to cause harm

vampire

noun
A perversely bad, cruel, or wicked person:
Translations
شَبَح الميِّت الذي يجول لإمتصاص الدِّماءمَصَّاصُ الدِّمَاء
upír
vampyr
vampiir
vampyyriverenimijä
vampir
vámpírdenevér
vampíravampíra, blóîsuga
吸血鬼ヴァンパイア
흡혈귀
vampyras
vampīrs
vampirvampiră
upír
vampir
vampyr
ผีดูดเลือด
вампірупир
ma cà rồng

vampire

[ˈvæmpaɪəʳ]
A. N
1. (Zool) → vampiro m
2. (fig) → vampiro m; (= woman) → vampiresa f
B. CPD vampire bat Nvampiro m

vampire

[ˈvæmpaɪər] nvampire mvampire bat nvampire m

vampire

n (lit, fig)Vampir(in) m(f), → Blutsauger(in) m(f)

vampire

[ˈvæmpaɪəʳ] nvampiro

vampire

(ˈvӕmpaiə) noun
a dead person who is imagined to rise from the grave at night and suck the blood of sleeping people.

vampire

مَصَّاصُ الدِّمَاء upír vampyr Vampir βρυκόλακας vampiro vampyyri vampire vampir vampiro 吸血鬼 흡혈귀 vampier vampyr wampir vampiro вампир vampyr ผีดูดเลือด vampir ma cà rồng 吸血鬼
References in periodicals archive ?
com)-- Britannia Pictures has given the green light for development of "The Vampyre," a new Gothic horror.
Kat has starred in blue movies including Sugar Daddy and Vampyre Lovers and has achieved a certain renown.
14) Existen varios elementos intertextuales, particularmente asociados con esta actriz francesa y la pelicula Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) donde ella hizo el papel de Lucy.
The name of James Malcolm Rymer and his novel Varney, the Vampyre are not known to many today, but they crop up from time to time in unexpected ways, especially in popular culture.
It provides a literary history of well-known stories about vampires from Lord Byron to Bram Stoker's Dracula, then a collection of text excerpts, such as Bram Stoker's research notes, penny dreadfuls, Angela Carter's The Lady of the House of Love, Dracula, John Polidori's The Vampyre, Lord Byron's Fragment of a Story, Alexandre Dumas' A Visit to the Theatre, and Eliza Lynn Linton's The Fate of Madame Cabanel, with analysis.
It was to become the most celebrated brainstorming session in literary history: Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein and Polidori, inspired by Byron, came up with The Vampyre, which went on to spawn an unstoppable genre.
MARKING the 200th anniversary of the birth of literature's greatest ghost stories - Frankenstein and The Vampyre - Chepstow Museum has organised five nights of spooky events.
Invoking a persistent Gothic element in Victorian literature from The Vampyre to Dracula, "On the Neo-Victorian, Now and Then" begins by asking: "Are the Victorians the ultimate undead?
It was one of the most famous meetings of the minds in literary history, a gathering that yielded Polidori's The Vampyre (1819) and Mary's first work of fiction, Frankenstein, or The Modem Prometheus (1818).
Robert Southey (1774-1843) gave a lengthy description of witches, spectres and lamias (The Old Woman of Berkeley, written 1798, published 1799; the Gothic epic poem Thalaba the Destroyer, written 1800, published 1801), while John Stagg (1770-1823) published The Vampyre in The Minstrel of the North (1810):
As D'Arcy Wood is quick to recount, this contest among the sheltered friends and literary rivals (they weren't quite, as we say now with that wonderfully Frankensteinian word-merger, "frenemies") resulted in the two defining monsters of modernity: the creature from Frankenstein and, more waywardly, Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897), which emerged from the dim influence of Polidori's fragmentary Vampyre, itself adapted from Byron's own fragmentary ghost tale (51-53).
Stott, a professor of English at the University at Buffalo, is the latest to take a stab at the story, in The Poet and the Vampyre, which focuses on Byron.