vane

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vane

blade in a wheel moved by air, steam, or water: A weather vane shows the direction of the wind.; someone who is changeable or fickle
Not to be confused with:
vain – excessively proud of one’s appearance, qualities, etc.; conceited: She is very vain about her long black hair.; arrogant; egotistical; without effect or avail: Her efforts were in vain.; worthless; unimportant
vein – blood vessel; a natural channel; a body or stratum of ore: a rich vein of coal; a condition, mood, or temper: a vein of sadness; tone; touch; thread; streak
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

vane

 (vān)
n.
1. A weathervane.
2. Any of several usually relatively thin, rigid, flat, or sometimes curved surfaces radially mounted along an axis, as a blade in a turbine or a sail on a windmill, that is moved by or used to move a fluid.
3. The flattened, weblike part of a feather, consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft.
4.
a. The movable target on a leveling rod.
b. A sight on a quadrant or compass.
5. One of the metal guidance or stabilizing fins attached to the tail of a bomb or other missile.

[Middle English fane, vane, from Old English fana, flag; see pan- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vane

(veɪn)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) Also called: weather vane or wind vane a flat plate or blade of metal mounted on a vertical axis in an exposed position to indicate wind direction
2. (Mechanical Engineering) any one of the flat blades or sails forming part of the wheel of a windmill
3. (Mechanical Engineering) any flat or shaped plate used to direct fluid flow, esp a stator blade in a turbine, etc
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a fin or plate fitted to a projectile or missile to provide stabilization or guidance
5. (Zoology) ornithol the flat part of a feather, consisting of two rows of barbs on either side of the shaft
6. (Surveying) surveying
a. a sight on a quadrant or compass
b. the movable marker on a levelling staff
[Old English fana; related to Old Saxon, Old High German fano, Old Norse fani, Latin pannus cloth]
vaned adj
ˈvaneless adj

Vane

(veɪn)
n
(Biography) Sir Henry, known as Sir Harry Vane. 1613–62, English Puritan statesman and colonial administrator; governor of Massachusetts (1636–37). He was executed for high treason after the Restoration
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vane

(veɪn)

n.
2. any of a number of blades or plates attached radially to a rotating cylinder or shaft, as in a turbine or windmill, that move or are moved by a fluid, as steam or air.
3. a person who is readily changeable or fickle.
4.
a. (on a rocket) any fixed or movable surface providing directional control for atmospheric flight.
b. a similar plane surface in the exhaust jet of a reaction engine, providing directional control while the engine is firing.
5. the web of a feather.
[before 1100; Middle English; Old English fana flag, c. Old Saxon, Old High German fano, Old Norse -fani flag, cloth]

Vane

(veɪn)

n.
Sir Henry (Sir Harry Vane), 1613–62, British statesman and author.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vane - mechanical device attached to an elevated structurevane - mechanical device attached to an elevated structure; rotates freely to show the direction of the wind
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
weathercock - weathervane with a vane in the form of a rooster
wind tee - weather vane shaped like a T and located at an airfield
2.vane - a fin attached to the tail of an arrow, bomb or missile in order to stabilize or guide itvane - a fin attached to the tail of an arrow, bomb or missile in order to stabilize or guide it
arrow - a projectile with a straight thin shaft and an arrowhead on one end and stabilizing vanes on the other; intended to be shot from a bow
fin - a stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish
missile - a rocket carrying a warhead of conventional or nuclear explosives; may be ballistic or directed by remote control
3.vane - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or watervane - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or water
fan blade - blade of a rotating fan
eggbeater, helicopter, whirlybird, chopper - an aircraft without wings that obtains its lift from the rotation of overhead blades
impeller - the blade of a rotor (as in the compressor of a jet engine)
oar - an implement used to propel or steer a boat
paddle - a blade of a paddle wheel or water wheel
propeller, propellor - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or water
rotating mechanism - a mechanism that rotates
rudder blade - the vertical blade on a rudder
turbine - rotary engine in which the kinetic energy of a moving fluid is converted into mechanical energy by causing a bladed rotor to rotate
aerogenerator, wind generator, windmill - generator that extracts usable energy from winds
4.vane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaftvane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft
feather, plumage, plume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
barb - one of the parallel filaments projecting from the main shaft of a feather
blade - a broad flat body part (as of the shoulder or tongue)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
déflecteur de volet

vane

[veɪn] N (= weather vane) → veleta f; [of mill] → aspa f; [of propeller] → paleta f; [of feather] → barbas fpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vane

n (also weather vane)Wetterfahne f, → Wetterhahn m; (of windmill)Flügel m; (of propeller)Flügel m, → Blatt nt (of turbine)(Leit)schaufel f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vane

[veɪn] n (also weathervane) → segnavento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Henson's scheme (which at first was considered very feasible even by men of science,) was founded upon the principle of an inclined plane, started from an eminence by an extrinsic force, applied and continued by the revolution of impinging vanes, in form and number resembling the vanes of a windmill.
Henson's scheme, and of Sir George Cayley's, to the interruption of surface in the independent vanes. He made the first public experiment at Willis's Rooms, but afterward removed his model to the Adelaide Gallery.
Mason's MS.] This morning we had again some little trouble with the rod of the propeller, which must be entirely remodelled, for fear of serious accident - I mean the steel rod - not the vanes. The latter could not be improved.
One, wearing a military dress of buff, was his kinsman, Francis Lincoln, the Provincial Captain of Castle William; the other, who sat on a low stool beside his chair, was Alice Vane, his favorite niece.
"Some of these fables are really awful," observed Alice Vane, who had occasionally shuddered, as well as smiled, while her cousin spoke.
"And yet," whispered Alice Vane, "may not such fables have a moral?
Your voice and the voice of Sibyl Vane are two things that I shall never forget.
And now tell me-- reach me the matches, like a good boy--thanks--what are your actual relations with Sibyl Vane?"
"She was favored by young Henry Vane, who had come over from England a year or two before, and had since been chosen governor of the colony, at the age of twenty-four.
At her departure, it appears, from the best authorities, that she gave the great Chair to her friend Henry Vane. He was a young man of wonderful talents and great learning, who had imbibed the religious opinions of the Puritans, and left England with the intention of spending his life in Massachusetts.
I said this the other day to Madame do Maisonrouge--that Miss Vane dressed in the costume of the past.
You know I told you, in writing some time ago, that I had tried to get some insight into the position of woman in England, and, being here with Miss Vane, it has seemed to me to be a good opportunity to get a little more.