Vardhamana


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Vardhamana

(ˌvɑːdəˈmɑːnə)
n
(Biography) See Mahavira
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Besides, some authors who lived after Somananda were apparently unaware of his alleged authorship of the Samiksa: thus Vardhamana, the twelfth-century author of the Ganaratnamahodadhi, merely states that "Bhartrhari is the author of the Vakyapadiya and Prakirna and the commentator of three chapters of the Mahabhasya." (116) On the other hand, such a testimony can hardly be considered to be decisive, all the more since it is not impossible that in this work devoted to a ganapatha, Vardhamana simply did not see the point of mentioning works ascribed to Bhartrhari that did not belong to the field of grammar.
For Jains, it commemorates the time when prince Mahavira, also known as Vardhamana, achieved moksha - freedom from the cycle of life and death.
It was when Vardhamana and Buddha abandoned their royal trappings that they became great.
Like Buddha, Vardhamana Mahavira, who lived in the 6th century BC, left his family home to wander the valley of the Ganges.
Por su parte el Jainismo, cuyo primer representante fue Vardhamana Mahvira (599-527 a.C.), defiende antologicamente la Tattvartha Sutra (la "no violencia, no posesion, no determinacion") desde un vitalismo universal de gran importancia ante el problema ecologico actual.