smallpox

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small·pox

 (smôl′pŏks′)
n.
An acute, highly infectious, often fatal disease caused by a poxvirus and characterized by high fever and aches with subsequent widespread eruption of pimples that blister, produce pus, and form pockmarks. Smallpox was eradicated worldwide by 1979 as a result of numerous vaccination campaigns and exists only as a laboratory specimen. Also called variola.

[Early Modern English small pockes, small pustules (as opposed to great pockes, the great pox or syphilis), from pockes, pl. of pock; see pock.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

smallpox

(ˈsmɔːlˌpɒks)
n
(Pathology) an acute highly contagious viral disease characterized by high fever, severe prostration, and a pinkish rash changing in form from papules to pustules, which dry up and form scabs that are cast off, leaving pitted depressions. Technical name: variola
[C16: from small + pox. So called to distinguish it from the Great Pox, an archaic name for syphilis]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

small•pox

(ˈsmɔlˌpɒks)

n.
an acute, highly contagious, febrile disease, caused by the variola virus and characterized by a pustular eruption that often leaves permanent pits or scars: eradicated worldwide by vaccination programs.
[1510–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

small·pox

(smôl′pŏks′)
A highly infectious and often fatal disease caused by a virus and characterized by fever, headache, and severe pimples that result in extensive scarring. Smallpox was once a dreaded killer of children and caused the deaths of millions of Native Americans after the arrival of European settlers in the Americas. Following a worldwide vaccination campaign, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980, although samples have been preserved in laboratories in the US and Russia. See Note at Jenner.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smallpox - a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever and weakness and skin eruption with pustules that form scabs that slough off leaving scarssmallpox - a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever and weakness and skin eruption with pustules that form scabs that slough off leaving scars
pox - a contagious disease characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pock marks
alastrim, Cuban itch, Kaffir pox, milk pox, pseudosmallpox, pseudovariola, variola minor, West Indian smallpox, white pox - a mild form of smallpox caused by a less virulent form of the virus
pock - a pustule in an eruptive disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

smallpox

noun
Related words
adjective variolous
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَرَض الجدْري
neštovice
kopper
isorokko
himlõ
bólusótt, stórabóla
smittkoppor
çiçek hastalığı

smallpox

[ˈsmɔːlpɒks] N (Med) → viruela f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

smallpox

[ˈsmɔːlpɒks] nvariole fsmall-scale [ˌsmɔːlˈskeɪl] adj
[undertaking, business] → peu important(e), de petite envergure
[map, model] → à petite échellesmall screen n
the small screen → le petit écransmall-size [ˈsmɔːlsaɪz] small-sized [ˈsmɔːlsaɪzd] adjpetit(e)small talk npapotage m
to make small talk → papotersmall-time [ˌsmɔːlˈtaɪm] adj [actor, celebrity] → de troisième ordre
a small-time thief → un voleur à la petite semainesmall town n (US)petite ville fsmall-town [ˌsmɔːlˈtaʊn] adjprovincial(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

smallpox

[ˈsmɔːlˌpɒks] n (Med) → vaiolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

small

(smoːl) adjective
1. little in size, degree, importance etc; not large or great. She was accompanied by a small boy of about six; There's only a small amount of sugar left; She cut the meat up small for the baby.
2. not doing something on a large scale. He's a small businessman.
3. little; not much. You have small reason to be satisfied with yourself.
4. (of the letters of the alphabet) not capital. The teacher showed the children how to write a capital G and a small g.
small ads
advertisements in the personal columns of a newspaper.
small arms
weapons small and light enough to be carried by a man. They found a hoard of rifles and other small arms belonging to the rebels.
small change
coins of small value. a pocketful of small change.
small hours
the hours immediately after midnight. He woke up in the small hours.
ˈsmallpox noun
a type of serious infectious disease in which there is a severe rash of large, pus-filled spots that usually leave scars.
small screen
television, not the cinema. This play is intended for the small screen.
ˈsmall-time adjective
(of a thief etc) not working on a large scale. a small-time crook/thief.
feel/look small
to feel or look foolish or insignificant. He criticized her in front of her colleagues and made her feel very small.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

small·pox

n. viruela, enfermedad infecciosa viral que se manifiesta con un cuadro febril agudo y erupción de ampollas y pústulas diseminadas por todo el cuerpo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

smallpox

n viruela
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.