ischemia

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is·che·mi·a

 (ĭ-skē′mē-ə)
n.
A decrease in the blood supply to a bodily organ, tissue, or part caused by constriction or obstruction of the blood vessels.

[New Latin ischaemia, from Greek iskhaimos, a stopping of the blood : iskhein, to keep back; see segh- in Indo-European roots + haima, blood.]

i·sche′mic adj.

is•che•mi•a

(ɪˈski mi ə)

n.
local deficiency of blood supply produced by vasoconstriction or local obstacles to the arterial flow.
[1855–60; < Greek ísch(ein) to suppress, check + -emia]
is•che′mic, adj.

ischemia

Reduced blood supply to a part of the body or to an organ, especially the brain.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ischemia - local anemia in a given body part sometimes resulting from vasoconstriction or thrombosis or embolism
ischaemic stroke, ischemic stroke - the most common kind of stroke; caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain (as from a clot blocking a blood vessel)
TIA, transient ischemic attack - brief episode in which the brain gets insufficient blood supply; symptoms depend on the site of the blockage
anemia, anaemia - a deficiency of red blood cells
Translations

is·che·mi·a

n. isquemia, insuficiencia de riego sanguíneo a un tejido o parte;
silent ______ silenciosa.

ischemia

n isquemia
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with large defects and pulmonary hypertension are more prone for development of pulmonary vascular obstruction (Eisenmenger's syndrome) with symptoms of exertional dyspnoea, chest pain, syncope, hemoptysis, clubbing, erythrocytosis, and cyanosis (right-to-left shunt).
This discordance between the clinical state and neurological deficit observed on imaging may be due to the fact that chronic vascular obstruction can over time lead to development of collaterals.
Contracted clots may form an impermeable seal and help prevent vascular obstruction, but confer resistance to penetration by drugs that break down fibrin, the structural component of clots, a common treatment option for heart attacks and strokes.
The addition of thermographic imaging allowed a rapid, noninvasive, subjective assessment of the affected limb by providing additional information regarding the extent of tissue involvement, confirmation of vascular compromise, and further clues as to the location of the vascular obstruction.