Veblen


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Veb·len

 (vĕb′lən), Thorstein Bunde 1857-1929.
American economist who described a fundamental conflict between the provision of goods and the making of money. In his popular study The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899) he coined the phrase conspicuous consumption.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Veblen

(ˈvɛblən)
n
(Biography) Thorstein (ˈθɔːstɪn). 1857–1929, US economist and social scientist, noted for his analysis of social and economic institutions. His works include The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899) and The Theory of Business Enterprise (1904)
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Veb•len

(ˈvɛb lən)

n.
Thor•stein (ˈθɔr staɪn, -stən) 1857–1929, U.S. economist and sociologist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Veblen - United States economist who wrote about conspicuous consumption (1857-1929)
2.Veblen - United States mathematician (1880-1960)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gilady uses a rational-choice framework and the work of Thorstein Veblen to develop a theoretical foray into the role that considerations of prestige play in shaping states' behavior on the world stage.
This continued commoditisation of the sector has made education assume the qualities of what economists call Veblen goods.
Among them are Thorstein Veblen's "The Economic Theory of Women's Dress" in Popular Science Monthly, Oscar Wilde's "The Philosophy of Dress" in New York Daily Tribune, "Modern Beau Brummellism" in London Society, contemporary accounts of Victorian weddings, "Progress of the Sewing Machine" in Bow Bells, and "A Japanese Village in London" in The Ladies Treasury.
Imported from Turkey in the late 1500s, tulips were a status symbol, so it is reasonable to assume that the beautiful and durable flowers took on the characteristics of a Veblen good (we discussed Veblen goods in A Digression on Diamonds) whereby higher prices spurred more demand and, therefore, higher prices.
Building on Folkestad's work, Veblen (2012) adds one more characteristic--modes of transmission, which pertains to how the knowledge is passed on and describes formal music learning.
What I propose to do in the following pages is read Borges's reference to Thorstein Veblen two decades later in "El escritor argentino y la tradiciAaAaAeA n" as a belated response to the questions this second accusati opens up.
More than a quarter of a century even before Whitehead's observations, Thorstein Veblen coined the term neo-classical precisely to capture those economists who were making this sort of mistake (see Lawson 2013).
But in the opinion of sociologist Thorstein Veblen, beautified books and other decorative objects assumed artificial values rooted in their social context, resulting in "conspicuous consumption" (p.
Read even one page of The Portable Veblen and you'll realize you're in the presence of a unique comic voice.
I thus argue that Mildred Pierce draws upon Thorstein Veblen's classic 1899 socio-economic text Theory of the Leisure Class.
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FICTION The Portable Veblen by Elizabeth McKenzie Publisher: 4th Estate.