Venetian


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Related to Venetian: palazzo, wynn

Ve·ne·tian

 (və-nē′shən)
adj.
Of or relating to Venice, Italy, or its people, language, or culture.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Venice, Italy.
2. The variety of Italian spoken in Venice.

[Medieval Latin Venetiānus, from Venetia, Venice.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Venetian

(vɪˈniːʃən)
adj
1. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Venice or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Venice or its inhabitants
n
3. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Venice
4. (Furniture) See Venetian blind
5. (Furniture) (sometimes not capital) one of the tapes that join the slats of a Venetian blind
6. (Textiles) a cotton or woollen cloth used for linings
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ve•ne•tian

(vəˈni ʃən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Venice, its residents, or their speech.
n.
2. a native or resident of Venice.
3. the form of Upper Italian spoken in Venice and its environs.
4. (l.c.) venetian blind.
5. Also called Vene′tian cloth′.
a. a wool or worsted fabric made in satin or twill weave and sometimes napped, used in the manufacture of coats, suits, skirts, and dresses.
b. a cotton fabric constructed in satin or twill weave, used chiefly for linings.
[1400–50;< Middle French < Medieval Latin Venetiānus=Veneti(a) Venice + Latin -ānus -an1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Venetian - a resident of VeniceVenetian - a resident of Venice      
Venezia, Venice - the provincial capital of Veneto; built on 118 islands within a lagoon in the Gulf of Venice; has canals instead of streets; one of Italy's major ports and a famous tourist attraction
Italian - a native or inhabitant of Italy
Adj.1.Venetian - of or relating to or characteristic of Venice or its peopleVenetian - of or relating to or characteristic of Venice or its people; "Venetian glass"; "Venetian canals"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بُنْدُقِي، نِسْبَة إلى فينيسيا
žaluzie
persienne
venetsialainen
vénitienvénitienne
rimlagluggatjald
venezianaveneziano
žalūzijas
VenetiaanVenetiaansVenetiaanse

Venetian

[vɪˈniːʃən]
A. ADJveneciano
B. Nveneciano/a m/f
C. CPD Venetian blind Npersiana f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Venetian

[vɪˈniːʃən] adj [gondola, gondolier, port, society] → vénitien(ne)Venetian blind nstore m vénitien
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Venetian

adjvenezianisch
nVenezianer(in) m(f)

Venetian

:
Venetian blind
nJalousie f
Venetian glass
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Venetian

[vɪˈniːʃn] adj & nveneziano/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Venetian

(vəˈniːʃən) : Venetian blind
a window blind made of thin, movable, horizontal strips of wood, metal or plastic. We have put up Venetian blinds to stop our neighbours looking in our front windows.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"But if you were once a Venetian senator, you must have been a wealthy man.
I was in the mean time printing the material of Venetian Life and the Italian Journeys in a Boston newspaper after its rejection by the magazines; and my literary life, almost without my willing it, had taken the course of critical observance of books and men in their actuality.
"Oh, my lord," said D'Artagnan, quietly shutting the window, "it is not worth while weeping yet, for probably an hour hence there will not be one of your mirrors remaining in the Palais Royal, whether they be Venetian or Parisian."
van der Luyden's portrait by Huntington (in black velvet and Venetian point) faced that of her lovely ancestress.
On the second day, numbers of Right Whales were seen, who, secure from the attack of a Sperm Whaler like the Pequod, with open jaws sluggishly swam through the brit, which, adhering to the fringing fibres of that wondrous Venetian blind in their mouths, was in that manner separated from the water that escaped at the lip.
On the 10th, the term for which the late Lord Montbarry had hired the Venetian palace, expired.
The roof is about twelve feet high, and runs to a pretty sharp angle, as if there were a regular ridge-pole there; while these ribbed, arched, hairy sides, present us with those wondrous, half vertical, scimetar-shaped slats of whale-bone, say three hundred on a side, which depending from the upper part of the head or crown bone, form those Venetian blinds which have elsewhere been cursorily mentioned.
She was sweet to me as the bunch of white flowers that, in their frail Venetian vase, stand so daintily on my old bureau as I write, doing their best to sweeten my thoughts.
Penney--the head of the Egyptian medical service, who, in a small steamer, penetrated one degree beyond Gondokoro, and then came back to die of exhaustion at Karthoum--nor Miani, the Venetian, who, turning the cataracts below Gondokoro, reached the second parallel-- nor the Maltese trader, Andrea Debono, who pushed his journey up the Nile still farther--could work their way beyond the apparently impassable limit.
It is easy, then, in fancy, to people these silent canals with plumed gallants and fair ladies--with Shylocks in gaberdine and sandals, venturing loans upon the rich argosies of Venetian commerce--with Othellos and Desdemonas, with Iagos and Roderigos--with noble fleets and victorious legions returning from the wars.
But he picked up amazingly little for a knowing Venetian: it must be added that where there is a perpetual fast there are very few crumbs on the floor.
We have in Italy, for example, the Duke of Ferrara, who could not have withstood the attacks of the Venetians in '84, nor those of Pope Julius in '10, unless he had been long established in his dominions.