Venice

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Ven·ice

 (vĕn′ĭs)
1. A city of northeast Italy on islets within a lagoon in the Gulf of Venice, an inlet of the Adriatic Sea. Founded in the 6th century ad by refugees fleeing the Lombard invaders who had gained control of the mainland, it became a major maritime power by the 13th century and spread its influence over northern Italy and the eastern Mediterranean by the 15th century. Its territories were gradually lost to the Turks, and in 1797 it passed to Austria. Venice was ceded to Italy in 1866. It is a tourist and commercial center known for its canals.
2. A district of Los Angeles, California, on Santa Monica Bay. Laid out with canals in the early 1900s, it is known for its beach and bohemian culture.

Venice

(ˈvɛnɪs)
n
(Placename) a port in NE Italy, capital of Veneto region, built on over 100 islands and mud flats in the Lagoon of Venice (an inlet of the Gulf of Venice at the head of the Adriatic): united under the first doge in 697 ad; became an independent republic and a great commercial and maritime power, defeating Genoa, the greatest rival, in 1380; contains the Grand Canal and about 170 smaller canals, providing waterways for city transport. Pop: 271 073 (2001). Italian name: Venezia

Ven•ice

(ˈvɛn ɪs)

n.
1. Italian, Venezia. a seaport in NE Italy, built on numerous small islands in the Lagoon of Venice. 361,722.
2. Gulf of, the N arm of the Adriatic Sea.
3. Lagoon of, an inlet of the Gulf of Venice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Venice - the provincial capital of VenetoVenice - the provincial capital of Veneto; built on 118 islands within a lagoon in the Gulf of Venice; has canals instead of streets; one of Italy's major ports and a famous tourist attraction
Venetia, Veneto, Venezia-Euganea - a region of northeastern Italy on the Adriatic
Grand Canal - the major waterway in Venice, Italy
Venetian - a resident of Venice
Translations
Benátky
Venetsia
Velence
Venezia
Wenecja
Benátky
Benetke
Venedig

Venice

[ˈvenɪs] NVenecia f

Venice

[ˈvɛnɪs] nVenise

Venice

nVenedig nt

Venice

[ˈvɛnɪs] nVenezia
References in classic literature ?
The writer stated that he had recently arrived in Venice. He had previously heard that Ferrari was with Lord and Lady Montbarry, at one of the old Venetian palaces which they had hired for a term.
A doctor had latterly been called in to his lordship--an Italian doctor, long resident in Venice. Inquiries being addressed to this gentleman (a physician of undoubted capacity and respectability), it turned out that he also had never seen Ferrari, having been summoned to the palace (as his memorandum book showed) at a date subsequent to the courier's disappearance.
Aldus Manutius (Aldine edition), Venice, 1495 (complete works).
John Hay, who did not know me except as a young Westerner who had written poems in the Atlantic Monthly, asked me how I would like Venice, and promised that they would have the salary put up to a thousand a year, under the new law to embarrass privateers.
No privateers ever came, though I once had notice from Turin that the Florida had been sighted off Ancona; and I had nearly four years of nearly uninterrupted leisure at Venice, which I meant to employ in reading all Italian literature, and writing a history of the republic.
We left Venice before Mr and Mrs Gowan did, but they were not so long upon the road as we were, and did not travel by the same way, and so when we arrived we found them in a lodging here, in a place called the Via Gregoriana.
She has a lover, who has followed her, first all the way from Switzerland, and then all the way from Venice, and who has just confided to me that he means to follow her everywhere.
This Venice, which was a haughty, invincible, magnificent Republic for nearly fourteen hundred years; whose armies compelled the world's applause whenever and wherever they battled; whose navies well nigh held dominion of the seas, and whose merchant fleets whitened the remotest oceans with their sails and loaded these piers with the products of every clime, is fallen a prey to poverty, neglect and melancholy decay.
We reached Venice at eight in the evening, and entered a hearse belonging to the Grand Hotel d'Europe.
Their name had been mixed up ages before with one of the greatest names of the century, and they lived now in Venice in obscurity, on very small means, unvisited, unapproachable, in a dilapidated old palace on an out-of-the-way canal: this was the substance of my friend's impression of them.
"From Venice," he said, with a trace of Italian accent.
IN this chapter I am going to tell you in a few words the story of one of Shakespeare's plays called The Merchant of Venice. It is founded on an Italian story, one of a collection made by Ser Giovanni Fiorentino.