venom

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Related to Venoms: Snake venoms

ven·om

 (vĕn′əm)
n.
1. A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.
2. Malice; spite: "They dislike making their just criticism of a useful and earnest man an excuse for a general discharge of venom from small-minded opponents" (W.E.B. Du Bois).

[Middle English venim, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *venīmen, from Latin venēnum, poison; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

venom

(ˈvɛnəm)
n
1. (Biochemistry) a poisonous fluid secreted by such animals as certain snakes and scorpions and usually transmitted by a bite or sting
2. malice; spite
[C13: from Old French venim, from Latin venēnum poison, love potion; related to venus sexual love]
ˈvenomless adj
ˈvenomous adj
ˈvenomously adv
ˈvenomousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ven•om

(ˈvɛn əm)

n.
1. the poisonous fluid that some animals, as certain snakes and spiders, secrete and introduce into the bodies of their victims by biting, stinging, etc.
2. something suggesting poison in its effect, as malice or jealousy.
3. Archaic. poison in general.
[1175–1225; < Old French venim, venin « Latin venēnum magical potion, poison]
syn: See poison.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ven·om

(vĕn′əm)
A poisonous substance that is secreted by certain snakes, spiders, scorpions, and insects. It can be transmitted to a victim by a bite or sting.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

venom

- Comes from Latin venenum, the love potion Venus used to attract people to each other—but later came to describe "poison."
See also related terms for poison.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.venom - toxin secreted by animalsvenom - toxin secreted by animals; secreted by certain snakes and poisonous insects (e.g., spiders and scorpions)
animal toxin, zootoxin - a toxin resembling bacterial toxins in its antigenic properties that is found in the fluids of certain animals
kokoi venom - a potent neurotoxin found in a particular frog
snake venom - venom secreted by certain snakes
2.venom - feeling a need to see others suffervenom - feeling a need to see others suffer
malevolence, malignity - wishing evil to others
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

venom

noun
2. poison, toxin, bane snake handlers who grow immune to snake venom
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

venom

noun
Anything that is injurious, destructive, or fatal:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حِقْد، ضَغينَهسُم الأفْعىسُمّ
jedjedovatostjízlivostzlost
giftgiftighedondskabsfuldhed
myrkky
otrov
méreg
eiturillgirni
悪意
독액
su įtūžiu
indeļaunumsniknums
venin
strup
gift
ความรู้สึกโกรธและขมขื่น
sự căm ghét

venom

[ˈvenəm] N (lit) → veneno m (fig) → veneno m, malicia f
he spoke with real venomhabló con veneno or malicia, habló con palabras envenenadas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

venom

[ˈvɛnəm] n
[snake, spider] → venin m
(fig) (in voice, look)venin m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

venom

n (lit)Gift nt; (fig)Bosheit f, → Gehässigkeit f; he spoke with real venom in his voiceer sprach mit hasserfüllter Stimme; a book review full of venomein giftiger Verriss eines Buches; she spat her venom at himsie giftete ihn wütend an; his pen, dipped in venomseine giftige Feder
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

venom

[ˈvɛnəm] n (also) (fig) → veleno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

venom

(ˈvenəm) noun
1. the poison produced by some snakes, scorpions etc, transmitted by biting or stinging. the venom of a cobra.
2. great ill-feeling, anger etc. He spoke with venom.
ˈvenomous adjective
1. (of snakes etc) poisonous. venomous reptiles.
2. (of people, their words etc) full of ill-feeling. a venomous speech.
ˈvenomously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

venom

سُمّ jízlivost gift Gehässigkeit φαρμάκι ponzoña myrkky venin otrov veleno 悪意 독액 vergift gift jad veneno яд gift ความรู้สึกโกรธและขมขื่น zehir sự căm ghét 毒液
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

ven·om

n. veneno, sustancia tóxica.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

venom

n veneno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Another brow may ev'n inherit The venom thou hast poured on me Be still my spirit!
From the alighting board, instead of the former spirituous fragrant smell of honey and venom, and the warm whiffs of crowded life, comes an odor of emptiness and decay mingling with the smell of honey.
The parrot fortunately offered no further interruption to the entertainment, the whole venom of his nature apparently having been cherished up and hurled against the twins in that one impetuous outburst.
She's such a match as the horse-fly is to th' horse: she's got the right venom to sting him with--the right venom to sting him with."
It was impossible to doubt that, whatever painful efficacy there might be in the secret sting of remorse, a deadlier venom had been infused into it by the hand that proffered relief.
"Thou mayest well say that, Sancho," replied Don Quixote, "as thou sawest her in the full perfection of her beauty; for the enchantment does not go so far as to pervert thy vision or hide her loveliness from thee; against me alone and against my eyes is the strength of its venom directed.
Dost understand me, priest?" And the old man leaned far across the table so that his eyes, burning with an insane fire of venom, blazed but a few inches from those of the priest.
I didn't think you had so much political venom in you," laughed Anne, who was not much excited over the tidings.
Lady Carey looked for a moment across at the Prince, and her eyes were full of venom.
'A reptile contemporary has recently sweltered forth his black venom in the vain and hopeless attempt of sullying the fair name of our distinguished and excellent representative, the Honourable Mr.
"He could jut out his neck an ell," it was said, "and cast his venom about four rods; a serpent of countenance very proud, at the sight or hearing of men or cattle, raising his head seeming to listen and look about with great arrogancy." But if it was this same serpent it had lost its venom, and in the days when Bysshe and his sisters played about the garden, they looked upon it as a friend.
The gathered venom in Lady Lundie seized the opportunity of planting its first sting.