Venus flytrap


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Venus flytrap

or Venus' flytrap also Venus's flytrap
n.
An insectivorous plant (Dionaea muscipula) of the coastal plain of the Carolinas. It has hinged two-lobed leaves that close to entrap insects that land on them.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Venus flytrap

A plant of North and South Carolina having leaf blades that are edged with bristles and that can close and trap insects. The insects are then digested and absorbed by the plant.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

Venus flytrap

nVenusfliegenfalle f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Even without a brain or a nervous system, the Venus flytrap appears to make sophisticated decisions about when to snap shut on potential prey, as well as to open when it has accidentally caught something it can't eat.
Think of a huge and deceptively lovely Venus flytrap carnivorous plant opening itself up to entice insects like flies to their death.
A Pluto mousetrap B Mars dogtrap C Venus flytrap D Neptune flycatcher 2.
ASK DIARMUID How do I look after a Venus flytrap? I want to pot it but I'm not sure what type of compost I should use.
Q How do I look after a Venus flytrap? I want to re-pot it but I'm not sure what type of compost I should use.
Insectivorous plants These include the sundew, pitcher plant and venus flytrap. These insectivorous plants have additional benefits when used in a terrarium.
The Venus flytrap can be tricked into shutting its jaw-like leaves by tickling its innards with a cocktail stick.
SPRIGS, FRONDS AND SPRAYS Unlike Rousseau's jungle, in the student work below, the plants may be identifiable: a Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) in the upper left, a red ginger (Alpinia purpurata) in the upper right, blue flowers in the lower left reminiscent of Vanda coerulea orchids, and perhaps Heliconia in the lower right.
From Venus Flytrap food to cigar humidors, its distilled water has found a niche market that, at the last count, is being used in 40 different ways.