phrasal verb

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phrasal verb

Phrasal verbs are verb phrases that have idiomatic meanings—that is, their meaning is not obvious from the individual words that make up the phrase.
Phrasal verbs are made up of a verb + a preposition or an adverbial particle, and their meaning is uniquely tied to each particular combination.
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phrasal verb

n.
An English verb complex consisting of a verb and one or more following particles and acting as a complete syntactic and semantic unit, as look up in She looked up the word in the dictionary or She looked the word up in the dictionary.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phrasal verb

n
(Grammar) (in English grammar) a phrase that consists of a verb plus an adverbial or prepositional particle, esp one the meaning of which cannot be deduced by analysis of the meaning of the constituents: "take in" meaning "deceive" is a phrasal verb.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phras′al verb′


n.
a combination of verb and one or more adverbs or prepositions, as catch on, take off, or put up with, functioning as a single semantic unit and often having an idiomatic meaning not predictable from the meanings of the individual parts.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

phrasal verb

A verb made up of a verb plus one or more particles, for example “clean up.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phrasal verb - an English verb followed by one or more particles where the combination behaves as a syntactic and semantic unit; "`turn out' is a phrasal verb in the question `how many turned out to vote?'"
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
frázové sloveso
fraseverbum
PartikelverbRedewendung
összetett ige
sambandssögn
frázové sloveso
glagol s predlogom
takım fiil

phrasal verb

nPhrasal Verb nt, Verb mit bestimmter Präposition oder bestimmtem Adverb
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

phrase

(freiz) noun
1. a small group of words (usually without a finite verb) which forms part of an actual or implied sentence. He arrived after dinner.
2. a small group of musical notes which follow each other to make a definite individual section of a melody. the opening phrase of the overture.
verb
to express (something) in words. I phrased my explanations in simple language.
phraseology (freiziˈolədʒi) noun
the manner of putting words and phrases together to express oneself. His phraseology shows that he is a foreigner.
ˈphrasing noun
1. phraseology.
2. the act of putting musical phrases together either in composing or playing.
ˈphrase-book noun
a book (eg for tourists) which contains and translates useful words and phrases in a foreign language.
phrasal verb
a phrase consisting of a verb and adverb or preposition, which together function as a verb. `Leave out', `go without', `go away', are phrasal verbs.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include beyond narrative: on the syntax and semantics of ly-adverbs, presentatives and the syntactic encoding of contextual information, locality and the functional sequence in the left periphery, Germanic verb particle variation, medial noun phrase adjuncts in English, a diachronic perspective, and Gothic sai and the proto-Germanic verb-based discourse particle *se.
Seventy-seven case studies address, for example, the accusative plus infinitive construction in English, comparative deletion and subdeletion, inverse linking, logophoricity, preposition stranding, quantifier scope ambiguities, split topicalization, stylistics fronting, temporal reference, topicalization in Asian languages, verb particle constructions, and wh-in-situ, among other topics.
In "The man filled up the gas tank," "up" is a verb particle (i.e., part of a phrasal verb), not a preposition.
In this case, a verb particle must be added to impart a telic interpretation to the predicate (the examples are from Slabakova 2001: 84):
Verb particle and preposition acquisition in language-impaired preschoolers.
The verb particle and the past participle may both be considered as nonverbal (or more precisely: LESS WRBAL) elements originating in the same position.
The core of the latters' analysis is summarized as follows: "The verb particle `door' ...
Finnish prepositions, in contrast, usually take partitive complements, and their historical background is more obscure that that of the postpositions--Sadeniemi (1960) suggests that prepositions might go back to adverbs or verb particles that have undergone a reanalysis.
As the part of verb phrases, they talk about negative and positive verb phrases, verb particles and critics.
Since the acquisition of reversal by children has been heavily researched and it is going to be elaborated on in this paper as well, it needs to be added that prefixes are not the only way to express reversal, as the notion of undoing may also be realised by means of verb particles, e.g.
Given that a copula has little in common with other verbs, it is unsurprising that it often fails to appear with verb particles, including those in (48a).
In particular, the first relational terms used by children learning English are typically not verbs but rather verb particles such as "in," "out," "up," "down," "on," and "off" (Choi and Bowerman 1991; Farwell 1977; Gentner 1982; Gopnik and Choi 1995; McCune-Nicolich 1981; Nelson 1974; Smiley and Huttenlocher 1995; Tomasello 1987).