phrasal verb

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phrasal verb

Phrasal verbs are verb phrases that have idiomatic meanings—that is, their meaning is not obvious from the individual words that make up the phrase.
Phrasal verbs are made up of a verb + a preposition or an adverbial particle, and their meaning is uniquely tied to each particular combination.
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phrasal verb

n.
An English verb complex consisting of a verb and one or more following particles and acting as a complete syntactic and semantic unit, as look up in She looked up the word in the dictionary or She looked the word up in the dictionary.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phrasal verb

n
(Grammar) (in English grammar) a phrase that consists of a verb plus an adverbial or prepositional particle, esp one the meaning of which cannot be deduced by analysis of the meaning of the constituents: "take in" meaning "deceive" is a phrasal verb.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phras′al verb′


n.
a combination of verb and one or more adverbs or prepositions, as catch on, take off, or put up with, functioning as a single semantic unit and often having an idiomatic meaning not predictable from the meanings of the individual parts.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

phrasal verb

A verb made up of a verb plus one or more particles, for example “clean up.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phrasal verb - an English verb followed by one or more particles where the combination behaves as a syntactic and semantic unit; "`turn out' is a phrasal verb in the question `how many turned out to vote?'"
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
frázové sloveso
fraseverbum
PartikelverbRedewendung
összetett ige
sambandssögn
frázové sloveso
glagol s predlogom
takım fiil

phrasal verb

nPhrasal Verb nt, Verb mit bestimmter Präposition oder bestimmtem Adverb
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

phrase

(freiz) noun
1. a small group of words (usually without a finite verb) which forms part of an actual or implied sentence. He arrived after dinner.
2. a small group of musical notes which follow each other to make a definite individual section of a melody. the opening phrase of the overture.
verb
to express (something) in words. I phrased my explanations in simple language.
phraseology (freiziˈolədʒi) noun
the manner of putting words and phrases together to express oneself. His phraseology shows that he is a foreigner.
ˈphrasing noun
1. phraseology.
2. the act of putting musical phrases together either in composing or playing.
ˈphrase-book noun
a book (eg for tourists) which contains and translates useful words and phrases in a foreign language.
phrasal verb
a phrase consisting of a verb and adverb or preposition, which together function as a verb. `Leave out', `go without', `go away', are phrasal verbs.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
They address location verbs in Basque; univerbation of light verb compounds and the obligatory coding principle; variation and grammaticalization in Bantu complex verbal constructions, focusing on the dynamics of information growth in Swahili, Rangi, and SiSwati; the verb-particle construction in English; the noun-verb complex predicates in Hindi and the rise of non-canonical subjects; Malayalam ceyy-support and its relation to event and argument structure; complex predicates as complementation structures; and complex predicate formation through voice incorporation.
Two important consequences concerning youse when it is not nominative marked: (i) it lacks subject-verb agreement; for instance, youse is really stupid, and (ii) it can follow the particle in the verb-particle construction; for instance, I'll phone up youse (Henry 1995: 38).
In (V) an example of an Amazon parse tree for an unexpected verb-particle construction is given.