dyspraxia

(redirected from Verbal Dyspraxia)
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dyspraxia

(dɪsˈpræksɪə)
n
(Pathology) pathol an impairment in the control of the motor system; it may be developmental or acquired, resulting from a cerebral lesion
[dys- + prax(is) + -ia]
Translations

dyspraxia

[dɪsˈpræksiə] ndyspraxie f

dys·prax·i·a

n. dispraxia, impedimento o dolor al realizar cualquier movimiento coordinado.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mikey Akers STEPHEN SUTTON INSPIRATION AWARD Despite his battle to express himself, schoolboy Mikey, 16, has given a voice to all those who suffer from verbal dyspraxia. The neurological condition makes it difficult for sufferers to co-ordinate the precise movements used in the production of spoken language.
Despite his battle to express himself, Mikey Akers, 16, has given a voice to all those who suffer from verbal dyspraxia, a condition that makes it difficult for sufferers to speak.
Mikey suffers from verbal dyspraxia, which affects his everyday life.
Her speech included a poem written from her own perspective as the mother of an 11-year-old son with autism and verbal dyspraxia, and with his daily struggles with speech and understanding the world around him.
The youngster also has verbal dyspraxia. "Because of that he could not speak well," Ceridwen said.
As mentioned before, partial speech loss of the subject of this study is caused by the mosaic trisomy of chromosome 13 or mosaic form of Patau syndrome and concurrent developmental verbal dyspraxia. According to professor Ounap (conversation on 7th July 2011), there are no other people with Patau syndrome living in Estonia, because this anomaly has been prenatally well-diagnosed since the 1990s, i.e.
We went back to the doctor and they thought he might have something called developmental verbal dyspraxia.
Children with verbal dyspraxia, also called apraxia of speech, have speech problems such as:
Mr Bercow, 44, is sometimes mentioned as a possible defector to Labour - his wife, Sally, is a member - and has a son, Oliver, who suffers from verbal dyspraxia.
His three-year-old son Oliver has verbal dyspraxia, a condition that affects speaking ability even among children with normal or above-average intelligence.
Expressive delays alone may stem from hearing loss, oral-motor dysfunction such as verbal dyspraxia, a disruption in language output as in word finding or the ability to construct sentences, or in a non-reinforcing linguistic environment.