verapamil

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ve·rap·a·mil

 (və-răp′ə-mĭl′)
n.
A calcium channel blocker drug, C27H38N2O4, that acts as a coronary vasodilator and is used in its hydrochloride form to treat hypertension and certain cardiac arrhythmias.

[vera(tryl), one of its constituents (from New Latin Vērātrum, hellebore genus; see veratrine) + -pamil, vasodilating drug suffix (perhaps p(ropyl) + am(ino) + (nitr)il(e)).]

verapamil

(vɪˈræpəˌmɪl)
n
(Pharmacology) med a calcium-channel blocker used in the treatment of angina pectoris, hypertension, and some types of irregular heart rhythm

ve•ra•pam•il

(ˌvɪər əˈpæm əl, ˌvɛr-)

n.
a white, crystalline powder, C27H38N2O4, used as a calcium blocker in the treatment of angina and certain arrhythmias.
[1965–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verapamil - a drug (trade names Calan and Isoptin) used as an oral or parenteral calcium blocker in cases of hypertension or congestive heart failure or angina or migraine
calcium blocker, calcium-channel blocker - any of a class of drugs that block the flow of the electrolyte calcium (either in nerve cell conduction or smooth muscle contraction of the heart); has been used in the treatment of angina or arrhythmia or hypertension or migraine
Translations

verapamil

n verapamilo, verapamil m
References in periodicals archive ?
Others (nicardipine); calcium from include Plendil entering the artery constipation, (felodipine); Calan, and heart cells, flushing and edema Covera-HS, Verelan which open up the in the legs and (verapamil); and blood vessels, and feet.
Some commonly prescribed drugs in this class include verapamil (Isoptin, Verelan, Calan) and diltiazem (Cardizem).
Revenue and income increases in both the 1999 fourth quarter and year are attributable to a number of events including the launch of a generic version of Verelan in the second quarter of 1999 and record product sales of Tiazac(R), Biovail's prescription drug used in the treatment of angina and hypertension, in the United States and in Canada.

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