Verner


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Ver•ner

(ˈvɜr nər, ˈvɛər-)

n.
Karl Adolph, 1846–96, Danish linguist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Verner - Danish philologist (1846-1896)
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References in classic literature ?
And his face and phrases were on the front page of all the newspapers just then, because he was contesting the safe seat of Sir Francis Verner in the great by-election in the west.
Verner is pretty well rooted; all these rural places are what you call reactionary.
And why don't they attack men like Verner for what they are, which is something about as old and traditional as an American oil trust?"
He certainly knew much more about rural problems than either Hughes, the Reform candidate, or Verner, the Constitutional candidate.
As Fisher went to and fro among the cottages and country inns, it was borne in on him without difficulty that Sir Francis Verner was a very bad landlord.
The figure of Verner seemed to be blackened and transfigured in his imagination, and to stand against varied backgrounds and strange skies.
For instance, we both want to turn Verner out of Parliament, but what weapon are we to use?
Verner was not only a hard landlord, but a mean landlord, a robber as well as a rackrenter; any gentleman would be justified in hounding him out.
You are going to denounce Verner from a public platform, naming him for what he did and naming the poacher he did it to.
"Verner can hit him anyhow, and nobody must say a word.
"And Mother Biddle and Long Adam, the poacher, are not personalities," said Fisher, "and suppose we mustn't ask how Verner made all the money that enabled him to become--a personality."
A young doctor, named Verner, had purchased my small Kensington practice, and given with astonishingly little demur the highest price that I ventured to ask--an incident which only explained itself some years later, when I found that Verner was a distant relation of Holmes, and that it was my friend who had really found the money.