eglomise

(redirected from Verre eglomise)

eglomise

(ˈɛɡləʊˌmaɪz)
n
(Crafts) the technique of gilding the back of a sheet of glass
References in periodicals archive ?
In her hand-painted rings and earrings, which, in the past collection, used a mother-of-pearl base, this time around, Wynn Wynn utilizes the reverse glass painting technique, verre eglomise.
Verre eglomise expert Miriam Ellner has created a gilded wall painting, while furniture-maker Katie Stout contributed a light sculpture.
This 210-lot, $15m offering focuses on the work of three of the most significant artists and designers of the period-the superbly crafted furniture of Emile-Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933); the refined lacquers of Jean Dunand (1877-1942); and the elegantly stylised drawings, paintings and verre eglomise panels of Jean Dupas (1882-1964; Fig.
Diminution reduces the triad of the (symbolic) letter, the (iconic) illustration, and the (indexical)gesture to their limit conditions by converting the strangely distancing and fussily ennobling medium of the verre eglomise into something resembling a prepared slide.
The front of the 41mm watch has Mumtaz hand- painted on a scratch- resistant Verre Eglomise sapphire; Shah Jahan is on a sapphire crystal at the back.
Although rather grand, the gilding and verre eglomise glass panels aren't too fussy.
These things, if they are from the period and genuine, are usually mounted beneath a black and gold glass plate called verre eglomise and (depending on condition) tend to fall into the pounds 250-350 price bracket.
He also pays homage to Old World decor by making two mirrors using verre eglomise (French term meaning gilded glass).
Conservation work is ever pressing, none more so than on the 17th-century mirrors with verre eglomise borders at Drumlanrig which recently very nearly imploded--'terrifying indeed'--and on the fabulous Louis-Francois Roubiliac family tombs in the church at Warkton, next to the Boughton estate, whose internal iron supports are badly corroded.
The photograph Verre Eglomise Panels for Atlanta Hotel, 2010, also depicts objects being prepared for public installation.
These reveal the brilliant polychrome effects, verre eglomise, coloured tesserae, and gilding of the marble pulpit, which are less successfully conveyed in this new volume.
And yet the verre eglomise technique from which Pumhosl's is adapted was used by Josef Albers, among others.