Vertumnus


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Vertumnus

(vɜːˈtʌmnəs) or

Vortumnus

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) a Roman god of gardens, orchards, and seasonal change
[from Latin, from vertere to turn, change]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in classic literature ?
Thus saying, from her Husbands hand her hand Soft she withdrew, and like a Wood-Nymph light OREAD or DRYAD, or of DELIA's Traine, Betook her to the Groves, but DELIA's self In gate surpass'd and Goddess-like deport, Though not as shee with Bow and Quiver armd, But with such Gardning Tools as Are yet rude, Guiltless of fire had formd, or Angels brought, To PALES, or POMONA, thus adornd, Likest she seemd, POMONA when she fled VERTUMNUS, or to CERES in her Prime, Yet Virgin of PROSERPINA from JOVE.
One plant had wreathed itself round a statue of Vertumnus, which was thus quite veiled and shrouded in a drapery of hanging foliage, so happily arranged that it might have served a sculptor for a study.
Giuseppe Arcimboldo Vertumnus (Emperor Rudolph II) 1591, oil on wood
To such examples of retro-metamorphosis we might also add the related act of rejuvenation that Medea performs in Metamorphoses 7 when she uses witchcraft to restore her father-in-law Aeson to his youthful form of forty years earlier.13 Furthermore, amongst the classical poem's modest cast of shape-shifters (Proteus, Vertumnus, Thetis, Achelous, Periclymenus, and Mestra), who are capable of serially self-metamorphosing into a variety of forms, only one--the 'exceptional' Mestra--begins, as Andrew Feldherr notes, as a fully mortal or 'human figure'.
I pay close attention to the reference to Vertumnus, god of seasons, and Ovid's story of this shape-shifting god and the human woman he strenuously woos, Pomona.
Cramer, 1779)) X Parides vertumnus pyrophanus (Zikan, 1937) X Protesilaus aguiari (R.F.
When he painted this portrait of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II (1552-1612), Giuseppe Arcimboldo used his imagination, and portrayed him as "Vertumnus," the Roman god of vegetation and the seasons.
"Propertius 4.2: Slumming with Vertumnus?" AJP 121.2: 259-77.
VERTUMNUS, who had not made the frame in 11 previous starts, came good for young Jack Duern, who produced the 25-1 shot with a nicely judged late effort to beat favourite Attrition by half a length in the 6f apprentices' handicap.
No image is more lavish than "Vertumnus", named after a Roman god but actually a portrait in flora of the artist's last patron, Rudolf II,.
Significantly, the author has chosen as symbol of his work Vertumnus, a native Roman deity who presided over change and mutability, instead of the canonical Proteus.