Very Large Array


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Very Large Array

n. Abbr. VLA
A Y-shaped pattern of radio telescopes in New Mexico with a maximum radius of 21 kilometers (13 miles).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Murphy and the Next-Generation Very Large Array Science Advisory Council
Using the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the US, the team observed radio emission from hydrogen in a distant galaxy and found that it would have contained billions of young, massive stars surrounded by clouds of hydrogen gas.
The 27 dish-shaped radio antennae that make up the Very Large Array move on tracks and tilt to pick up the clearest signal coming from the object they're observing.
Death Stars, Weird Galaxies, And A Quasar-Spangled Universe: The Discoveries Of The Very Large Array Telescope by Karen Taschek is an informative and easy-to-follow study of the Very Large Array (VLA) as constructed by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in in San Augustin, New Mexico.
But recent analyses of archival Very Large Array radio-telescope data led by Luis F.
Follow-up observations with the Very Large Array radio telescope near Socorro, N.M., revealed outflowing jets, additional evidence that the protostar is growing by accreting matter.
For example, a LUN may be one entire array, or a very large array may be divided into two or three LUNs.
Ongoing radio observations at New Mexico's Very Large Array by Greg Taylor (National Radio Astronomy Observatory and Kavli Institute for Particle Physics and Cosmology) and his colleagues show that the giant flare's afterglow is expanding asymmetrically and that material is moving up to 80 percent of the speed of light in one direction, which strongly suggests that the magnetar ejected material from one hemisphere rather than uniformly in all directions.
To detect the clumps, David Wilner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and his colleagues relied on the Very Large Array (VLA), a network of radio telescopes near Socorro, N.M.
The Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope near Sorroro, N.

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