vestibular system

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vestibular system

n
(Physiology) the sensory mechanism in the inner ear that detects movement of the head and helps to control balance

vestibular system

The part of the inner ear dealing with balance. It includes two sacs (saccule and utricle) containing gravity-sensitive otoliths, and three fluid-filled semicircular ducts which register movement.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vestibular system - organs mediating the labyrinthine sense; concerned with equilibrium
ear - the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
semicircular canal - one of three tube loops filled with fluid and in planes nearly at right angles with one another; concerned with equilibrium
sensory system - the body's system of sense organs
References in periodicals archive ?
Audiological and vestibular function tests in hypothyroidism.
KEYWORDS: Auditory neuropathy, Pure-tone hearing threshold, Acoustic immittance, Auditory brainstem response, Vestibular function, Nervous system disease.
11] demonstrated that electrical stimulation of canal afferents affects the perception of head orientation, and in addition improves vestibular percepts in patients lacking normal vestibular function.
The vestibular function scores of the ITG and ITGD groups were higher than the controls.
Because the complaints result from asymmetric vestibular function in most patients, for this reason, in vestibular tests, both labyrinths are usually stimulated equally and the responses obtained are tried to be compared.
sup][29] With further evolution of the disease process, the vestibular function changes gradually.
However, as AR systems evolve, they will become the technology of choice, as their see-through feature enables normal vestibular function and haptic feedback.
The sections cover fundamentals of function; fundamentals of dysfunction; medical assessment and vestibular function tests; medical and surgical management; and rehabilitation, assessment, and management of peripheral vestibular disorders.
These diagnoses were reached on the basis of (a) absence of typical paroxysmal positional nystagmus indicative of canalolithiasis, presence of persistent positional nystagmus and positional vertigo during an examination performed on a symptomatic day; (b) no history of previous recurrent BPV to imply cupulolithiasis; (c) history, examination findings and vestibular function tests indicative of an alternate cause for positional vertigo such as vestibular migraine (VM), endolymphatic hydrops, vestibular schwannoma, unilateral or bilateral vestibulopathy.
Approximately 25% of VM cases exhibit a unilateral reduction of peripheral vestibular function and about 50% of VM cases show vestibuloocular asymmetry [61].
Such neurodegenerative changes could account for the peripheral vestibular dysbalance observed in this study and previous studies analyzing vestibular function in PD patients [3,11].
Vestibular neuritis presents with a subacute onset over hours of incapacitating vertigo, nausea and vomiting because of unilateral loss of vestibular function.