vestment

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vest·ment

 (vĕst′mənt)
n.
1. A garment, especially a robe or gown worn as an indication of office or state.
2. Ecclesiastical Any of the ritual robes worn by members of the clergy, acolytes, or other assistants at services or rites, especially a garment worn at the celebration of the Eucharist.

[Middle English vestement, from Old French vestment, from Latin vestīmentum, from vestīre, to clothe, from vestis, garment; see vest.]

vest·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

vestment

(ˈvɛstmənt)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a garment or robe, esp one denoting office, authority, or rank
2. (Clothing & Fashion) any of various ceremonial garments worn by the clergy at religious services
[C13: from Old French vestiment, from Latin vestīmentum clothing, from vestīre to clothe]
vestmental adj

vest•ment

(ˈvɛst mənt)

n.
1. a garment, esp. an outer garment.
2. vestments, attire; clothing.
3. an official or ceremonial robe.
4. one of the garments worn by the clergy and their assistants, choristers, etc., during divine service and on other occasions.
[1250–1300; < Medieval Latin vestīmentum priestly robe, Latin: garment =vestī(re) to dress]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vestment - gown (especially ceremonial garments) worn by the clergyvestment - gown (especially ceremonial garments) worn by the clergy
alb - a white linen liturgical vestment with sleeves; worn by priests
cassock - a black garment reaching down to the ankles; worn by priests or choristers
chasuble - a long sleeveless vestment worn by a priest when celebrating Mass
robe, gown - outerwear consisting of a long flowing garment used for official or ceremonial occasions
humeral veil, veil - a vestment worn by a priest at High Mass in the Roman Catholic Church; a silk shawl
orphrey - a richly embroidered edging on an ecclesiastical vestment
pallium - (Roman Catholic Church) vestment consisting of a band encircling the shoulders with two lappets hanging in front and back
pontifical - the vestments and other insignia of a pontiff (especially a bishop)
surplice - a loose-fitting white ecclesiastical vestment with wide sleeves

vestment

noun
Clothing worn by members of a religious order:
Translations
vestimentär
ornementparamentique

vestment

[ˈvestmənt] Nvestiduras fpl vestments (esp Rel) → vestiduras fpl

vestment

n
(of priest)Ornat m, → Gewand nt
(= ceremonial robe)Robe f, → Ornat m

vestment

[ˈvɛstmənt] n (Rel) → paramento liturgico
References in classic literature ?
Having fixed upon this, I hired a little bark to Jubo, a place about forty leagues distant from Pate, on board which I put some provisions, together with my sacerdotal vestments, and all that was necessary for saying mass: in this vessel we reached the coast, which we found inhabited by several nations: each nation is subject to its own king; these petty monarchies are so numerous, that I counted at least ten in less than four leagues.
By the chair stood the priests, their long hair falling over their magnificent glittering vestments, with lighted tapers in their hands, slowly and solemnly conducting the service.
In vulgar phrase, she had taken up the broomstick, and was just about to sally from the kitchen, when Jones accosted her with a demand of a gown and other vestments, to cover the half-naked woman upstairs.
The vestments of the stranger announced him to be one who held a responsible situation near the person of the captain of the Canadas; and who, as it would now seem, finding his errand of peace frustrated by the fierce impetuosity of his allies, was content to become a silent and sad spectator of the fruits of a contest that he had arrived too late to anticipate.
But the figure which most attracted the public eye, and stirred up the deepest feeling, was the Episcopal clergyman of King's Chapel, riding haughtily among the magistrates in his priestly vestments, the fitting representatives of prelacy and persecution, the union of church and state, and all those abominations which had driven the Puritans to the wilderness.
de Mazarin, in exchange for Percerin supplying him with a full suit of ceremonial vestments as cardinal, one fine day slipped letters of nobility into his pocket.
The old curly birches of the gardens, all their twigs laden with snow, looked as though freshly decked in sacred vestments.
That they had been engaged in the destruction of some building was sufficiently apparent, and that it was a Catholic place of worship was evident from the spoils they bore as trophies, which were easily recognisable for the vestments of priests, and rich fragments of altar furniture.
The Abbot was standing by the wall in his vestments. Having freed his short plump hands from beneath his chasuble he had folded them over his fat body and protruding stomach, and fingering the cords of his vestments was smilingly saying something to a military man in the uniform of a general of the Imperial suite, with its insignia and shoulder-knots which Father Sergius's experienced eye at once recognized.
Without doubt, Porthos had reasons for not abandoning this part of his vestments, for instead of quitting his hold on the flap in his hand, he pulled it toward him, so that D'Artagnan rolled himself up in the velvet by a movement of rotation explained by the persistency of Porthos.
They bore upon their countenances and in their vestments the traces of the heartaches they had undergone.
The dress of this individual was a mixture of the coarsest vestments of a husbandman with the leathern garments, that fashion as well as use, had in some degree rendered necessary to one engaged in his present pursuits.