Appian Way

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Ap·pi·an Way

 (ăp′ē-ən)
An ancient Roman road between Rome and Capua, begun in ad 312 and later extended to Brindisi, with a total length of more than 565 km (350 mi).

Appian Way

(ˈæpɪən)
n
(Placename) a Roman road in Italy, extending from Rome to Brindisi: begun in 312 bc by Appius Claudius Caecus. Length: about 560 km (350 miles)

Ap′pi•an Way′

(ˈæp i ən)
n.
an ancient Roman highway extending from Rome to Brundisium (now Brindisi): begun 312 B.C. by Appius Claudius Caecus. ab. 350 mi. (565 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Appian Way - an ancient Roman road in Italy extending south from Rome to BrindisiAppian Way - an ancient Roman road in Italy extending south from Rome to Brindisi; begun in 312 BC
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Translations

Appian Way

[ˈæpɪənˈweɪ] NVía f Apia

Appian Way

nAppische Straße
References in periodicals archive ?
During an event dubbed as "Partners Appreciation Night," Union Bank of the Philippines (UnionBank) awarded seven of its partners for their outstanding contribution to the bank's digital transformation journey, namely IBM, Deloitte, Via Appia, Trends & Technologies, SMS GT, Digivation, and Questronix.
This immense path that crossed through Illyricum, Macedonia, and Thrace, was itself a continuation of Via Appia. This huge span of trade, and its control under a single authority, enabled Ivan Asen II to implement an ambitious building program in Tarnovo and to strike gold coins in his new mint in Ohrid.
Another is a hybrid -- mixing a depiction of a Lebanese mountain with another of Via Appia, built to connect ancient Rome to southeast Italy.
The opening edition sees presenter Mary Beard, pictured, riding the Via Appia and climbing up to the top seats of the Colosseum.
La primera abarca el culto del Apostol Pablo en Roma, centrando la investigacion en dos zonas: la via Ostia donde se encuentra San Pablo Extramuros con el sepulcro del Apostol, y la via Appia que alberga las primeras evidencias de su culto.
The book was published by Via Appia Press, in Franklin.
But what we know from Italy is that roads were named after the consul or general who made them - hence the Appian Way or Via Appia is named after Appius.