Vicar of Bray


Also found in: Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Vicar of Bray

(breɪ)
n
1. (Biography) a vicar (Simon Aleyn) appointed to the parish of Bray in Berkshire during Henry VIII's reign who changed his faith to Catholic when Mary I was on the throne and back to Protestant when Elizabeth I succeeded and so retained his living
2. (Music, other) Also called: In Good King Charles's Golden Days a ballad in which the vicar's changes of faith are transposed to the Stuart period
3. a person who changes his or her views or allegiances in accordance with what is suitable at the time
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
FOR one vicar, this week has not all been about the royal wedding, with Vicar Of Bray reaching his own impressive milestone - his 31st birthday.
Mr Peevski is a Bulgarian Vicar of Bray: his media outlets have a habit of changing their tone according to who is in power.
Simon Aleyn, who famously kept switching his faith in the 16th century, is better known as translated in 1579, provided the inspiration ANSWERS: 1 Australia; 2 Plutarch; 3 Aberdeen; 4 It is designed to stand against a wall; 5 A mineral which surrounds another mineral of a different type; 6 George Best; 7 The Vicar of Bray; 8 Seize the day; 9 The South Atlantic; 10 The Prince of Wales.
What did you do instead?" I can't think of any other historical period where attitudes to sex have been turned upside down quite so fast, except during the English Civil War when the government in power switched from licentious Cavaliers to puritanical Roundheads and back again, and people like the Vicar of Bray tried to hang onto their jobs by agreeing with everybody.
THE old song about the Vicar of Bray is as appropriate today as it was when it first emerged "Whatever king may reign, I