Vietnam War

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Vietnam War

n.
A protracted military conflict (1954-1975) between South Vietnam, supported by United States forces, and Communist North Vietnam. The war resulted in a North Vietnamese victory and unification of Vietnam under Communist rule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vietnam War - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United StatesVietnam War - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United States
Annam, Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Viet Nam, Vietnam - a communist state in Indochina on the South China Sea; achieved independence from France in 1945
Translations
Vietnamkrieg
References in periodicals archive ?
Pat was a lifelong resident of the area and a proud Viet Nam War U.
Critique: Exceptionally well written with the text being presented in 'first Steve, then Fred' format, "Long Daze at Long Binh" is an inherently fascinating and exceptionally informative read replete with wit, a little wisdom, a bit of insight, and a whole lot of information on what the Viet Nam War was like for two side-by-side draftees.
Rather, it pays attention to the cultural and political significance of the omissions in the representation of the Viet Nam war thus far.
So I lived the Viet Nam war through my brother and I wanted to be supportive," the Sheriff said.
Mohammad Ali was an outspoken, confident young man who vigorously voiced his opinion about the Viet Nam War and racial inequality in America.
Curtis is a highly valued and strongly recommended contribution to the growing body of Viet Nam War literature.
There are some pitfalls for the reader, particularly one unfamiliar with the vocabularies and gazetteer of the Viet Nam War.
This approach would, in turn, have deepened his analysis of the Second Viet Nam War, and given historical context to the development of new religions like the Cao Dai in southern Viet Nam (p.
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) recruited and trained over 30,000 Hmong to fight in the Laotian theater of the Viet Nam War.
Heck, some of these friends were even draft-dodgers who fled to Canada during the Viet Nam war, so I can appreciate different political opinions.
Among his topics are Hayakawa and assimilation versus Third World solidarity at San Francisco State College, Black Panthers and Red Guards, and solidarity by opposition to the Viet Nam War.
In the final article of this issue, Robert Vadas criticizes the myths that persist in this country about the Viet Nam war, and the failure of school textbooks to depict it accurately.