vindicative

Related to vindicative: vindictive

vindicative

(ˈvɪndɪˌkeɪtɪv; vɪnˈdɪkətɪv)
adj
1. obsolete vindictive; vengeful
2. tending to vindicate
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References in periodicals archive ?
He feels that it is a vindicative action or that he will be arrested or maybe humiliated.
"Occasionally I'll get mobbed at the supermarket, but that all right, it's not done in a spiteful, vindicative way like in England."
This is especially so since, as is elucidated later, even the grandest calamities that can befall a community or a nation (here the Poles) may contain within themselves a germ of spectacular triumphs later, to say nothing of the idea of the vindicative moral victory, the victory in defeat, fetishized in official Polish culture throughout the nineteenth century and indeed up until the present day in some quarters.
Their attitude to KP looks unnecessarily vindicative.
The film's perverse intimations of necrophilia (Hutchings 2008: 317) and satanic sacrificial rituals were without doubt topped by the notorious sequence in which Poelzig was skinned alive by the vindicative Wendegast.
"Favorables a la reconciliation, les destouriens sont prets pour une redevabilite dans le cadre d'une justice transitionnelle et non selective ou vindicative", a declare a l'Agence TAP, le secretaire general du Mouvement destourien (MD), Abdeljalil Zaddem.
Co nestaggio signale surtout sa defaillance a gouverner la situation et a exercer, de facon trop imprudente, une volonte vindicative et impolitique vis-a-vis les favoris du feu roi Sebastien.
Vicious and vindicative, they are obviously well suited.
(900 Nevertheless, it maintained that "not every tort concept is affected by the adoption of comparative negligence." (91) The court further recognized that the broader purpose of punitive damages in the state is to "vindicate[] a private right," and that "several cases conclude this vindicative quality adds a compensatory purpose." (92) The court even pointed to three other state jurisdictions where "punitive damages are awarded primarily to compensate and incidentally to punish" to support the proposition that punitive damages may also serve a compensatory function.