capsid

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cap·sid

 (kăp′sĭd)
n.
The protein coat that constitutes the shell of a virus particle.

[From Latin capsa, box.]

capsid

(ˈkæpsɪd)
n
(Animals) any heteropterous bug of the family Miridae (formerly Capsidae), most of which feed on plant tissues, causing damage to crops
[C19: from New Latin Capsus (genus)]

capsid

(ˈkæpsɪd)
n
(Biochemistry) the outer protein coat of a mature virus
[C20: from French capside, from Latin capsa box]

cap•sid

(ˈkæp sɪd)

n.
the coiled or polyhedral structure, composed of proteins, that encloses the nucleic acid of a virus. Also called protein coat.
[1960–65; < French capside= Latin caps(a) case2 + -ide -id1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capsid - a variety of leaf bugcapsid - a variety of leaf bug    
leaf bug, plant bug - small bright-colored insect that feeds on plant juices
four-lined leaf bug, four-lined plant bug, Poecilocapsus lineatus - yellow or orange leaf bug with four black stripes down the back; widespread in central and eastern North America
lygus bug - vector of viral plant diseases
2.capsid - the outer covering of protein surrounding the nucleic acid of a virus
virion - (virology) a complete viral particle; nucleic acid and capsid (and a lipid envelope in some viruses)
protein - any of a large group of nitrogenous organic compounds that are essential constituents of living cells; consist of polymers of amino acids; essential in the diet of animals for growth and for repair of tissues; can be obtained from meat and eggs and milk and legumes; "a diet high in protein"
References in periodicals archive ?
The study investigated the antiviral activity, safety, and tolerability of BMS-488043 -- a novel, oral small-molecule attachment inhibitor of HIV-1 that blocks viral entry by binding to the viral envelope protein gp120 and preventing it from binding to cellular CD4 receptors.
The first contains the genes that enable the production of key HIV proteins, including the viral envelope protein.
The first protocol will assess the safety of transferring DNA that will cause the recipients' cells to make HIV proteins-in particular, a viral envelope protein.