Aeneid

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Aeneid

(ɪˈniːɪd)
n
(Poetry) an epic poem in Latin by Virgil relating the experiences of Aeneas after the fall of Troy, written chiefly to provide an illustrious historical background for Rome
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ae•ne•id

(ɪˈni ɪd)

n.
a Latin epic poem by Virgil, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aeneid - an epic in Latin by Virgil; tells the adventures of Aeneas after the Trojan War; provides an illustrious historical background for the Roman Empire
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Translations

Aeneid

[ˈiːnɪɪd] NEneida f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aeneid

nÄneide f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
It was in translating part of Virgil's Aeneid that Surrey used blank verse.
There are occasional lapses into superficiality, which is perhaps inevitable when dealing with such a vast topic: apart from the brief discussion of a scene from Virgil's Aeneid (8-11), the Roman world is all but ignored.
Virgil and the Myth of Venice, heralded by Brian Richardson in his plenary lecture at RSA 2002 as exemplifying the best of the new studies on the history of the book, demonstrates tha t the paratexts that frame virtually every Italian Renaissance edition of a particular text -- Virgil's Aeneid -- indeed contributed to the forming of Venetian ideology and the myth of Venice.
The notes focus upon Wauchier's method of abbreviating his source, although they also identify citations from the Bible and, more surprisingly, from Virgil's Aeneid. The Glossary is by no means exhaustive.
The play is based on the story of Dido and Aeneas as told in the fourth book of Virgil's Aeneid. In the play, Dido, the queen of Carthage, is in love with Aeneas, who has taken refuge in Carthage after the fall of Troy.
To cite only one example, Virgil's Aeneid 6.625-27 reads: "Even had I a hundred tongues, a hundred mouths/and a voice of iron, I yet could not include / every shape of crime or list every punishment's name." Folly replaces crime (scelerum) with fools (fatuoru m) and punishment (poenarum) with folly (stulticiae), devaluing the epic verses.
Finally, Chapter 6 reads Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, not in conjunction with a theoretical text but with Virgil's Aeneid; the (very persuasive) comparison is accompanied by a discussion of translatio in its patrilineal and matrilineal forms.
His epic Annales, a narrative poem telling the story of Rome from the wanderings of Aeneas to the poet's own day, was the national epic until it was eclipsed by Virgil's Aeneid.
The concept of a covering, or integumentum, beneath which lie hidden meanings is central to Villena's translation and commentary of Virgil's Aeneid. The fifteenth-century humanist, Enrique de Aragon, known more commonly as the Marquis of Villena, is noted for his works of erudition, but also for his dabbling in the occult sciences.
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey are primary epics; Virgil's Aeneid and John Milton's Paradise Lost are secondary epics.
Sessions organizes his study into three parts, following the model of Virgil's Aeneid. "The Burning City," discusses Surrey's family background and life until 1537.
Author whose burlesque travesty of Virgil's Aeneid was the first extended literary composition written in the Ukrainian language; it distinguished him as the father of modern Ukrainian literature.